hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 166 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 114 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 98 10 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 91 9 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 78 2 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 77 7 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 58 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 58 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 45 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 6 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hardee or search for Hardee in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
had occurred yesterday. Soon after, General Bragg, appreciating his relations to the service, and feeling that a portion of his troops were dissatisfied with and disposed to criticise his military operations, to allay all apprehensions, patriotically requested the President to relieve him from the command of that army whose fortunes he had followed and whose fate he had shared through the trying vicissitudes of more than two years of active operations. His request was granted and Lieutenant-General Hardee temporarily placed in command, in a short time to be replaced by General Joseph E. Johnston. But the President, knowing General Bragg's abilities and appreciating them, was not disposed so summarily to dispense with his services, and hence immediately called him to Richmond in the capacity of military adviser. Thus ended the connection of General Bragg with the Army of the West, or, as then more properly termed, the Army of Northern Georgia. General Bragg relieved of command
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
12th of June, and General Grant has issued an order expelling the families of Confederate soldiers from the city. Sunday, July 20th.—This morning we had a grand review of Cheatham's division. General Polk and Governor Harris were on the field. The troops presented an imposing sight as the several brigades passed in review with banners floating to the breeze and bayonets gleaming brightly in the morning sunbeams. There were five brigades on the field. One of our country Captains forgot Hardee's Tactics at company inspection, and, growing desperate, shouted, Prepare to open ranks—widen out, split, and the boys split, widened out, and the ranks opened. But there was some side-splitting on that occasion, to the great discomfiture of the gallant Captain, who remembered the command, Order in ranks. But the Captain knows how to give the order, Fix bayonets—charge! when he meets the Yankees. July 22d.—On guard to-day. Donelson's and Maxey's brigades left this morning. Their de
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
etches given in the book— eleven very tame sketches of Confederates, and twenty-six sketches of Federals, most of the latter glowing eulogies. It will not do to say that the sketches are chiefly of Generals commanding armies, for many of the Federals sketched would not come under this head, while a number of Confederates who commanded armies, such as John B. Floyd, Henry A. Wise. J. A. Early, John B. Hood, S. D. Lee, Leonidas Polk, Stirling Price, Earl Van Dorn, Kirby Smith, Dick Taylor, Hardee, &c., are omitted. The truth is the Confederates largely outnumbered the Federals in men worthy of places in general history, and for Southern schools it is unpardonable to omit such names as Ashby, Stuart, Forrest, Hampton, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Pat. Cleburne, M. F. Maury, Buchanan, and scores of others who should be household words among our people. The sketches of Lee and Jackson are the only ones which make any pretence to being even fairly appreciative, (and they are both utterly unwor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
from her own breast. Lieutenant-General E. Kirby Smith, commanding the TransMississippi Department, was capable of no demonstrations which would compel the recall of the formidable reinforcements hastening to the relief of General Thomas. Such was the scarcity of troops in Alabama and Mississippi, that Lietenant-General Richard Taylor could detach but a handful in aid of Generals Cobb and Smith, who, with the Georgia State forces, were concentrated in the vicinity of Griffin. Lieutenant-General Hardee could muster forces barely sufficient to constitute respectable garrisons for the fixed batteries on the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina. General Beauregard looked in vain throughout the length and breadth of his extensive military division of the West for the means of effectual resistance, and was disappointed in the amount of assistance which he hoped to realize from the militia, home guards and reserves of the respective States embraced within the geograpical limits of his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
a sort of relief in turning away our sight from the field of Manassas, where, as we are told by Colonel Roman, there was not twenty-four hours food for the troops brought together for that battle. The fact is, he says, that some command was without food for forty hours after the battle. With what a strange commissariat we must have been afflicted! The scene soon shifts, and from Manassas General Beauregard is transferred to an immediate command, including forces under Generals Polk and Hardee, within the department of Kentucky and Tennessee, at the head of which General Albert Sidney Johnston had been placed, with headquarters at Bowling Green. The whole Confederate force in Johnston's department did not number more than forty-five thousand men of all arms and conditions, and badly equipped. They had to contend against one hundred and thirty thousand men, with splendid supplies of every kind. On meeting General Johnston at Bowling Green, after surveying the field of operatio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Military operations of General Beauregard. (search)
ses against fractions. This plan is minutely transcribed in Colonel Roman's book, because, as he says, of its strategic value and entire feasibility. He further remarks: It was indeed unfortunate that the War Department and Generals Bragg and Hardee did not understand the wisdom and necessity, at this juncture, of the concentration he advised. It would have resulted in the re-establishment of our lines of communication and depots of supplies, and in the eventual relief, if not permanent salthe Confederate capital. Acknowledging our incapacity in this matter, we leave to competent critics the task to pronounce judgment on the strategic value and entire feasibility of the plan to which neither the government nor Generals Bragg and Hardee gave their assent. But we cannot but admire the stoutness of a heart impervious to despair, and the fertility of that brain which to the very last was teeming with strategic conceptions of striking boldness. In the days of ancient Rome such a