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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Agreement between the United States Government and South Carolina as to preserving the status of the Forts at Charleston. (search)
rolina in reference to a fixed status of the forts in Charleston harbor at the time of the State's secession. Governor Orrth Carolina delegation with reference to the forts in Charleston harbor, early in December, 1860. Immediately after the pa and he, on his part, stipulated that the garrison in Charleston harbor should not be reinforced, or the status of the situatth reference to the status of the troops and forts in Charleston harbor; that it was a violation of that arrangement; and thatting an order to restore the status of the troops in Charleston harbor. The commissioners the next day addressed him a conot to allow any change in the status of the forts in Charleston harbor. After reading their communication, he returned it tt was to be pursued by the State towards the forts in Charleston harbor as to occupying them. After the communication alreade against the troops or forts of the United States in Charleston harbor. Mr. Buchanan, in his last communication to the co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
t unless they themselves should choose to begin it, and (same page, 276,) then proceeds to give the account of the bombardment of Sumter, without one single hint of the circumstances under which the Confederates opened fire. The author ignores the efforts of Virginia to keep the peace by calling the Peace Conference—the Crittenden compromise which was a Southern peace measure — the sending by South Carolina of peace commissioners, who were promised by Mr. Buchanan that the status in Charleston harbor should not be disturbed, but who refused to order Major Anderson back, when, in violation of the compact, he removed by night from Moultrie to Sumter—the fact that the Star of the West was attempting to violate again the plain terms of the compact by reinforcing and provisioning Sumter—the fact that one of the very first acts of the Confederacy was to send commissioners to Washington to treat with the Federal authorities for a peaceful and amicable adjustment upon the principles of eq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender of Vicksburg—a defence of General Pemberton. (search)
teries at Vicksburg. Some six or seven gunboats and transports succeeded; one boat was burned, another sunk, and the remainder were forced to put back. With the number of guns and weight of metal, it was impossible to effect more damage. Vicksburg, the grand key to the Mississippi—had only twenty-eight guns, of which two were smooth-bore thirty-two-pounders, two twenty-four-pounders, one thirty-pound Parrott, one Whitworth, and one ten-inch Mortar. Compare this with the armament of Charleston Harbor: Fort Pemberton alone, on Stono River, can compete with the entire batteries of Vicksburg. Every possible exertion was made to procure more ordnance, and even guns intended for the navy were diverted for army use. But probably owing to a scarcety of guns, and the time required to transport them, no further supply could be procured, and Vicksburg repelled every assault of the vaunted ironclads, and stood a siege of forty eight days, with an armament of twenty eight guns. After the p