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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 52 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 36 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 34 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 20 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Carlyle or search for Thomas Carlyle in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Orations at the unveiling of the statue of Stonewall Jackson, Richmond, Va., October 26th, 1875. (search)
like undertaking to describe Switzerland without making mention of the Alps, or to explain the fertility of the land of the Pharaohs without taking into account the enriching Nile. If what comes from the speaker to-day on this subject loses aught of its force because it is regarded as professional, he will deeply regret it. The same testimony might have more weight from the lips of many a statesman or soldier on these grounds to-day, but it would not be a whit more true. Sturdy old Thomas Carlyle, at all events, was not speaking professionally when he said: A man's religion is the chief fact with regard to him. The thing a man does practically lay to heart concerning his vital relation to this mysterious universe, and his duty and destiny there, that is in all cases the primary thing for him, and determines all the rest. It was surely the primary fact, the supreme fact in the history of General Jackson, and I cannot leave the subject without adding that those who confound his