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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From the Rapidan to Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
me, about 11 A. M., in sight of a column of the enemy crossing the pike from Germania Ford towards the plank-road. The Stonewall (Walker's) brigade had been sent down a left-hand road, driving in the enemy's pickets within a mile and a half of Germ The brigades were as follows from right to left of my line: Daniel, Doles, Battle (Rodes' division), G. H. Steuart's, Stonewall (Walker's), Stafford's (Johnson's division), Pegram, Hays, Gordon (Early's division); Battle's left and Steuart's right till dark, when they were brought off. General Stafford was mortally wounded in a similar attack by his own and the Stonewall brigades late in the afternoon. The fight ing closed at dusk with the repulse of a fierce attack on Pegram's brigade. ohnston's) of the latter, with the remnants of Doles's and the right of Daniel's brigades, struck on one flank, and the Stonewall (Walker's) of Johnson's division on the other. In a short time the enemy were driven from our works, leaving a hundred
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
ne this by the light from the reports of the brigades themselves, so far as they are given: Robert Ransom's, 1,600; Lawton's, 1,150; Wofford's, 854; Rodes's, 800; Barksdale, 800; Walker, 700; Trimble, 700; Hays, 550; Benning, 400; Cobb, 250; Stonewall, 250; Evans, 209; Kemper, 350; Garnett, 200; total, 8,813. The single rule of three gives the strength of the forty brigades on the ratio of these fourteen, to be 25, 180. So the approximate results reached from the reports of division and ut excused himself from responding, except to remind his friend, General Hill, that the Federal estimate of the Confederate strength at Sharpsburg was made by General Banks, who always saw the rebels through a powerful magnifying glass whenever Stonewall Jackson was about. In response to calls, General W. B. Taliaferro made a brief and stirring speech, which was loudly applauded. The officers of last year insisted upon a change, and a committee consisting of Captain C. A. Bohannon, Genera