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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 5 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 18 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Wharton or search for Wharton in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8 (search)
hold them. We returned to camp, and soon after this Rosser went on an expedition to New Creek. I remained on picket with the brigade. On page 17, General Early's Book, he says shortly after Rosser's return from his New Creek expedition Colonel Munford was sent to Hardy and Pendleton counties to procure forage for his horses, the cold weather having now set in so as to prevent material operations in the field. The third division of the second corps was sent in succession to General Lee, Wharton's division, and most of the cavalry and most of the artillery being retained with me. (Rosser accompanied my brigade.) We returned in about a week or ten days, bringing back a considerable drove of very fine fat cattle from Vandevender's farm, six or seven miles northwest of Petersburg, in the Moorefield Valley, and a large number of fat sheep said to have belonged to the United States Commissary Department. The great North Mountain was covered deep with snow when we crossed it, but th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 11 (search)
he enemy's column was seen defiling in the valley of Red River, supported by gunboats, out of harm's way, on its retreat to Alexandria. At McNutt's Hill Major-General Wharton assumed command of the cavalry corps. General Bee was ordered to proceed with his division—Bagby's and Debray's brigades—to Polk's plantation, about seven arksville in advance, and caused the enemy to move through that town speedily enough, to prevent them from destroying it. On the next day, in Mansura Prairie, General Wharton formed his small force into line, so as to bar the road, and compel the enemy to deploy, and show his strength. Banks' whole army was at hand. Then, an artiille, the brigade moved to the vicinity of Hempstead, where it camped at a short distance from the infantry division of Major-General J. C. Walker who, after General Wharton's death, had also been assigned to the command of the cavalry corps. There, days of gloom and despondency came on us. The news of General Lee's surrender w