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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 608 608 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 21 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 20 20 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April, 1865 AD or search for April, 1865 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of Pegram Battalion Association in the Hall of House of Delegates, Richmond, Va., May 21st, 1886. (search)
oud of our birthright, and feel ourselves not less Confederates or Virginians because we can honestly, earnestly and with heartfelt gratitude at the same time boast that we are American citizens! 7. Woman—The South Knows her in her Highest Sphere. Responded to by Colonel T. J. Evans. 8. Lee camp soldiers' home—The Wards of the Confederacy. Responded to by Colonel J. B. Purcell. 9. the press—May its Impressions Always be Correct. No response. Organization of Battalion, April, 1865. Colonel—Wm. J. Pegram. Adjutant-Wm.—Gordon McCabe. Surgeon—James Hines. Quartermaster—Robert B. Munford. Lieutenant-Colonel.—Joseph McGraw. Sergeant-Major—E. Keith Dargan. Assistant-Surgeon—Hall. Commissary—Arthur Parker. Chaplain—E. H. Rodman. Batteries: Purcell—First Captain, R. Lindsay Walker; Captain R. Lindsay Walker organized this Battery, and commanded it until March 31st, 1862, when he was made Major of Artillery; was after
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
ed and accomplished British officer, General G. Pomeroy Colley, C. B., who soon after fell in that wretched little Boerer war in the Transvaal, after giving a brief sketch of the armies of the world, ancient and modern, of the rise and organization of each, and of all the great levees of history, closing with an account of the American army, and its strange military history, says: The total number of men called under arms by the Government of the United States between April, 1861, and April, 1865, amounted to 2,759,049, of whom 2,656,053 were actually embodied in the armies. If to these we add the 1,100,000 men embodied by the Southern States during the same time, This is, I am satisfied, an overestimate of the strength of the Confederate armies, and I had intended in this address to discuss the question, and have sought and obtained some considerable material for doing so, but failing to obtain some returns to perfect a table I have had in preparation, I have deferred to some