Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hunter or search for Hunter in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Stonewall brigade at Chancellorsville. (search)
eral Ramseur expressed himself as perfectly satisfied that he had made a mistake and that he would correct his report. This was on the 4th May, 1864, and the battle of the Wilderness commenced on the 5th. All who were engaged or took an interest in the movements of the army, will remember how active the campaign of 1864 was. Readers will remember General Grant's flank movement from the Rapidan to reach Richmond. After second Cold Harbor General Early was detached with his corps. He met Hunter in front of Lynchburg, and drove him back into West Virginia. Early then moved down the Valley; fought the battle of Monocacy and advanced even to the defences of Washington city. He then retired into Virginia, and over into the Valley. Many small affairs took place in the Valley between the armies of General Early and General Sheridan. The armies were constantly in motion. 1 will not go into details of this service. Those who desire full and accurate information are referred to histo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of honorable B. H. Hill before the Georgia branch of the Southern Historical Society at Atlanta, February 18th, 1874. (search)
our enemies, and high positions of honor from our people! Crowds of intellectual imbeciles, like flocks of noisy blackbirds in harvest time, rush forward to secure, by personal scramble and trade, those positions of heaviest trust and responsibility, and thus murder all hope of having any vindication of our dead, or justice for our living in the Councils of the Nation. When such a State as Virginia, in such a crisis as this, for such a place as the Senate, repudiates such a statesman as Hunter—familiar with every fact of the Federal history, intimately familiar with every fact in Confederate councils, trained in debate, learned in constitutional law, courteous in manner, accurate in statement, powerful in logic, and respected even by our enemies—I think it is time to despair of doing anything in this generation to lift the South to her former position of influence and power in the Congress of the United States. To feed our people on frothy declamation now, however blown by procu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg—Address of Colonel C. S Venable (formerly of General R. E. Lee's staff), of the University of Virginia, before the Virginia division f the Army of Northern Virginia, at their annual meeting, held in the Virginia State Capitol, at Richmond, Thursday , October 30th, 1873. (search)
r by the pale cast of thought. On that day Sheridan was defeated by Hampton, whose force consisted of his own and Fitz. Lee's divisions, at Trevillian's depot. The main object of Sheridan's march towards Gordonsville was to make a junction with Hunter's and Crook's united corps, and bring it down to Grant's army. This operation being rendered impossible by Sheridan's defeat, on the night of the 12th of June, the Federal army began its march to the south side of the James. General Grant had u kill. As General Lee had sent Breckinridge back towards the Valley on June 8th, and General Early, with the Second corps (now numbering about eight thousand muskets—it having suffered more than either of the other corps), on the 12th to meet Hunter at Lynchburg, and restored Hoke's division to General Beauregard at Petersburg, the odds against him were much increased, as he had now with him only from twenty-five to twenty-seven thousand infantry. These bold movements show what he thought
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field telegrams from around Petersburg. (search)
fortified. R. E. Lee, General. headquarters, 11th August, 1864. General J. A. Early, via Staunton and Woodstock: Major-General Lomax has been directed to report to you to relieve General Ransom in command of cavalry. General Ransom on being relieved will report to the Adjutant and Inspector-General, Richmond. R. E. Lee, General. headquarters, 11th August, 1864. General J. A. Early, via Staunton and New Market, Va.: Washington Chronicle of the 8th states Sheridan has superseded Hunter. Another division of cavalry has been sent to General Anderson. Communicate with him. R. E. Lee, General. General G. W. C. Lee, A. D. C. to President: The President's telegram cannot be deciphered. Has the key word been changed lately. W. H. Taylor, A. A. G. headquarters, 12th August, 1864. General R. H. Anderson, Culpeper C. H, Va.: General Early at Newtown states the enemy to be moving up the Shenandoah with a view of reaching his rear apparently towards Front Royal. It m