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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 730 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 693 5 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 408 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 377 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 355 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 345 5 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 308 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 280 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 254 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 219 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Pope or search for John Pope in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 1 document section:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ceremonies connected with the unveiling of the statue of General Robert E. Lee, at Lee circle, New Orleans, Louisiana, February 22, 1884. (search)
ames would be to threaten the inferior force of Pope, upon which the protection of Washington dependen in the direction of Gordonsville to threaten Pope. This left him with only fifty-eight thousand ghteen thousand men, did not hesitate to attack Pope with thirty-seven thousand at hand, and more in of checking all serious advance on the part of Pope, and of so alarming the Washington authorities transfer of McClellan's army to the support of Pope. This enabled Lee to dispatch the rest of his ngly superior. The only hope was to annihilate Pope before the whole of McClellan's force could reach him. To accomplish this, an attack upon Pope's front even if successful would be unavailing, bec. His safety depended upon the prompt defeat of Pope. Failure was destruction. Lee had fifty thousand, Pope, seventy five thousand men. Under these circumstances the great battle of the second Manas delivered, resulting in the complete defeat of Pope and the retirement of his entire army within th[3 more...]