hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
on its consideration. the total armed forces reach the enormous amount of nearly four millions drawn from a population of only thirty-two millions—figures before which the celebrated uprising of the French Nation in 1793, or the recent efforts of France and Germany in the war of 1870-1871 sink into insignificance. I have thought, my comrades, that instead of taking for the subject of our recollections on this occasion of our annual reunion, any of the great achievements in battle of the fameer fire department, many of the latter belonging to Company G. There were also veterans who had served in the British army in the Crimea and elsewhere; Italians who had fought under Garibaldi; Frenchmen who had served in the armies of la belle France; Teutons from the Prussian army, and some of the fighting sons of Ireland, ever ready for the fray; others who had fought in the Mexican war, and exregulars of the United States. After the first warlike impulse of the North was exhausted, the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters and times of the Tylers. (search)
missioners and Mr. Calhoun, Secretary of State, April 12th, 1844; in June of the same year it was submitted to the Senate of the United States, and rejected. This proceeding occasioned the ill will of Mexico, and met with great disapproval from France and England, they being opposed, without any right or reason, to the United States extending its territory over Texas. Public opinion in the United States was divided on the subject, some of our most eminent men opposing annexation because it miserving and meritorious of all classes, and this constitutes its national nobility reflective of virtue, learning and cultivated talent. In most of the European governments we have seen at different periods some genius incarnate itself in a man. France has had its Richelieu, its Voltaire, its Napoleon, and so has other countries; and, for the time being, these incarnated geniuses made all other talent gravitate to it as controlling even the very current of national thought. Happily such is not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland Confederate monument at Gettysburg. (search)
pen public war. There could no longer be a question of proceeding against individuals as guilty of treason or rebellion. So Mr. Charles Francis Adams, the American minister to England, in June, 1861, wrote to his government that the recognition by the European powers of belligerent rights in the Confederate States relieved the government of the United States of responsibility for any misdeeds of the Confederates towards foreign persons or property. As soon as hostilities began, England and France recognized the Confederate States as entitled to rights of belligerents in lawful war. The Union government permitted flags of truce and exchange of prisoners, and for four years the status of war was self-evident, and admitted by all the world. As soon as the war began, the United States claimed and exercised the right of blockade, which, as it affects foreign nations, can only be exercised in a war. As soon as peace was restored, the civil courts in the Union were forced, by the inexorabl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A visit to BeauvoirPresident Davis and family at home. (search)
and sovereign States could not be in rebellion. You might as well say Germany rebelled against France, or that France (as she was beaten in the contest) rebelled against Germany. He said that oncFrance (as she was beaten in the contest) rebelled against Germany. He said that once in the hurry of writing he had spoken of it as the civil war, but had never used that misnomer again. He spoke of many of our generals and of the inside history of some of our great battles and celations of the Confederacy, and of how near we were several times to recognition by England and France. He spoke in the highest terms of praise of Captain Bullock's Secret Service of the Confederacy, after inviting Mr. Slidell, the Confederate commissioner, to have Confederate vessels built in France, and assuring him that there would be no obstacle to their going out afterwards, went square bac of Mr. Dayton, the United States Minister), and refused to allow them to go out. When he was in France, after the war, the Emperor sent him word, that If he desired an interview with him he would be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Building Confederate vessels in France. (search)
Building Confederate vessels in France. [The following extract, from Captain Bullock's Secret S defined the extent of our naval operations in France, and on the 16th of July, 1863, I closed a conof the Navy on the subject of getting ships in France, and as it affords conclusive proof of the hopat none of the ships would be allowed to leave France. Commenting upon these uncomfortable rumors, rine, giving authority to arm the corvettes in France, and specifying the number of guns, and I haveough its agent, has violated the neutrality of France by attempting the construction of ships in herl, and that the corvettes must not be armed in France, but must be nominally sold to some foreign meto us at some point beyond the jurisdiction of France. This would simply be substituting France forFrance for England, and then Denmark for France, and the Danish banker for Messrs. Bravay, and if the two mosd was also sorely vexatious to the majority in France, and the loss of prestige which failure in tha[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg—Address of Colonel C. S Venable (formerly of General R. E. Lee's staff), of the University of Virginia, before the Virginia division f the Army of Northern Virginia, at their annual meeting, held in the Virginia State Capitol, at Richmond, Thursday , October 30th, 1873. (search)
he places sacred to the myth of William Tell, transplanted by pious, patriotic fraud from the legends of another people to inspire the youth of that mountain land with the hatred of tyrants and the love of heroic deeds; or when he contemplates that wonderful monument by Thorwalsden, on the shores of Lake Lucerne, in commemoration of the fidelity in death of the Swiss Guard of Louis Xvi—a colossal lion, cut out of the living rock, pierced by a javelin, and yet in death protecting the lily of France with his paw—he asks himself how many men of the nations of the world have been inspired with a love of freedom by the monuments and heroic stories of little Switzerland? Comrades, we need not weave any fable borrowed from Scandinavian lore into the woof of our history to inspire our youth with admiration of glorious deeds in freedom's battles done. In the true history of this Army of Northern Virginia, which laid down its arms not conquered, but wearied with victory, you have a record o