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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
n from Elder's portrait in the Corcoran Gallery. Through the kindness of General Custis Lee, photographs of the General's saddle and sword were sent to the artists. uff, that the models might be seen to the best advantage. Death mask of General Lee. It should be noted that a foreign artist in writing about his model for the statue, asked for the death mask of General Lee. Miss Randolph could find no trace of such a cast, and General Custis Lee was confident that no such mask had beGeneral Custis Lee was confident that no such mask had been made. This seemed to settle the question. In selecting a commission to sit in judgment on the models, and to award the prizes, some gentlemen in Washington beingrke Mills as a suitable judge, and remarked that he had his father's mask of General Lee. With this clue, Miss Randolph wrote to Dr. Barbaim, who purchased the maskill had the world before them where to choose, with this advantage added. Governor Lee's work. In the meantime General Fitzhugh Lee was inaugurated Governor of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Valuable war relic. (search)
ommand of the Twelfth Battalion of Light Artillery. The battalions of artillery on field duty with army corps were known by the name of their commanders—such as Cutshaw, Brander, Poague, Pegram and others, and heavy artillery was represented by numbers —Battalion Twelve was really infantry supporting heavy artillery. They did duty at times in the field, were on duty at Wilmington, North Carolina, and served at Fort Harrison, below Richmond. When the city was evacuated they went out with Custis Lee's troops, and after the surrender Major Boggs unbuckled his sword, donned the uniform of a soldier of the cross, rejoined the Methodist Conference, and is now in charge at Suffolk, Virginia. He was a brave officer, and is greatly beloved as a parson. Of the particular company, whose muster roll is described, but little can be gathered now of the living members. The command was composed of men from Richmond county, Richmond city, and eastern North Carolina. The roll of the company.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Casualties in the old First at Gettysburg: two out of every three men who were carried into the charge shot down. (search)
Casualties in the old First at Gettysburg: two out of every three men who were carried into the charge shot down. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Will you kindly publish the following in justice to the old First regiment of Virginia infantry? I presume the fact that the official report of Pickett's division at the battle of Gettysburg was suppressed at the request of General Lee is well known. In the absence of such report many statements, more or less unjust to the division, have been made, all which have come to my knowledge, I have deemed it unnecessary to notice until I read the following report in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Serial No. 44, pages 330, published under the auspices of the Government: Record of Killed and Wounded at Gettysburg.—First Virginia regiment: Killed, 2; wounded, 62. Whether or not there was intentional misrepresentation in this report I deem it but just to give the true record, giving the names of the kill