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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 10 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 21st, 1861 AD or search for July 21st, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Richmond home guard of 1861. (search)
Franklin streets, which building was afterwards occupied by the Confederate government for its War Department; subsequently, our drills were in Military Hall over the Old Market, at the corner of Main and Seventeenth streets. After the men had attained something like proficiency in squad and company movement, we several times marched, in the afternoons, through the principal streets of the city, with a good band of fifes and drums. Sometime after the battle of First Manassas, on the 21st July, 1861, and about the time that our guns were nearly ready for us—a considerable delay having taken place in the delivery of them to us, by reason of the urgent demand for similar equipment in the army— Colonel William N. Pendleton, who had then, I think, been appointed Chief of Artillery of the Army of Northern Virginia, came down from Manassas with a message to the Governor from General Joseph E. Johnston, saying that General Johnston had received secret information that General McClellan was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
instant is slightly inaccurate in its account of this matter in two particulars. As this inaccuracy does injustice to other Confederate soldiers no less gallant than the Stonewall brigade, I am sure the chivalric old General and all others like him, with hearts in the right place, will be glad to have it corrected and the exact facts stated. The Fourth Alabama. It was to the Fourth Alabama regiment that the words were spoken by General Bee, about 2 or 3 o'clock in the afternoon of July 21, 1861. This regiment, with the Sixth North Carolina and Second and Eleventh Mississippi, constituted Bee's brigade; and as the brigade arrived at Manassas from the Valley in detachments, so it went into and fought through the battle, not as a whole, but by separate regiments. The Fourth Alabama having arrived at Manassas on Saturday, the 20th, was in movement very early on Sunday morning, the 21st, from near the junction towards the upper fords of Bull Run. The dust raised by the march of t