Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Burnside or search for Burnside in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
as the old saddle remained. To him a horse was a military necessity, and I do not believe that he rode on horseback twenty miles after the war ended. Major-General Burnside was an imposing figure on a horse. His remarkable moustaches and whiskers, with the folded Burnside hat on his head, made him easily recognizable. He alBurnside hat on his head, made him easily recognizable. He always wore full dress, even on the march, while a huge pair of snow-white gauntlets lent additional magnificence to his costume. As a rider Burnside was easy and graceful, and he seemed to love being in the saddle. Major-General McClellan was one of the handsomest men on horseback in the Federal service. He sat in the saddle wBurnside was easy and graceful, and he seemed to love being in the saddle. Major-General McClellan was one of the handsomest men on horseback in the Federal service. He sat in the saddle with a grace and ease peculiarly his own. All his appointments were in the most correct taste, and his horses were full-blooded animals. Wearing highly polished riding boots coming nearly up to his hips, and wrinkled from the instep to the knee, he would go splashing over the roads until horse, rider, and boots were covered with V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ne ever witnessed on this continent was revealed. The broad plain, level as a floor, stretching from the river to the position held by Lee and extending for miles to the right and left was literally blackened by the advancing lines of battle of Burnside's splendid army. In our front, covering the left flank of the advancing Federal infantry, were massed the field-batteries of the enemy, which we were soon to engage, long lines of cavalry protected their left flank, while Stuart's cavalry hovemaimed and mangled, are struggling in dumb agony over dead and dying men; caissons are blown up, guns dismounted, and the earth rocks and trembles to the hoarse bellowing of artillery. On our left the long, rolling volleys of musketry told that Burnside was grappling with Lee's matchless infantry, to be hurled back again and again in defeat and death. And then that crashing, deafening sound—like the roar of some mighty conflagration—a thousand buildings toppling and falling into volcanoes of f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
. [from the Richmond Dispatch, December 20, 1891.] Recollections of it, and bombardment of the city. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Sunday, December 13th, was the anniversary of the first battle of Fredericksburg, and looking back through the dim vista of the past that memorable event, with the bombardment of the 10th, is vividly recalled. It was a stormy and distressing time to many of the old residents of the old town, who were unable to leave the place when the Federal General Burnside notified them that he would bombard their homes. Many were compelled to remain within the town. A few of the residents gathered together what few articles they could carry with them, and leaving the city, located wherever they could find shelter within the lines of Lee's army, back of the town. Well do I remember with what cheerful resignation the female portion of the refugees accepted the trying conditions forced upon them by the abandonment of their homes, and how, after the battl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Thomas J. Jackson. (search)
of men he asked for he could easily have captured Washington. Jackson's plan at Fredericksburg. At Fredericksburg when he wanted to make an attack upon Burnside in the night, as I knew he did, he realized the demoralization of the Federal army and how easily they might have been driven into the river. He had made all of his arrangements to attack Burnside. He intended first to push forward his artillery, and after that to let them go to the rear and the infantry to charge. What we found out afterwards showed that if the attack had been made by Jackson as he proposed the Federal army would have been drowned or surrendered. Another evidence were in succession hurled against him. Later in the day A. P. Hill's division of his corps, which had been left at Harper's Ferry, reached the field and defeated Burnside on the right. At Fredericksburg. At Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862, he commanded the Confederate right wing, and in May, 1863, made his Chancellorsvil
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Nineteenth of January. (search)
the sons of his old soldiers lessons of peace. With rapid strategic movements after defeating the army of one hundred thousand men under McClellan before Richmond and hurling the boasting Pope and his great army into the defenses around Washington, he moved the besieging army from the beleagured Confederate capitol, and concentrated the enemy's forces to the defense of Washington, and in a few months recovered all Northern Virginia from the occupancy of the foe. When McClellan and Pope and Burnside and Hooker and Meade, each successfully commanding the largest and best equipped army ever gathered on the continent, entering no engagement with less than one hundred thousand men, each in turn tried to crush the noble little army of fifty thousand men, and each had in turn been defeated, then came Grant with the largest army of all. His mind was fully made up to give Lee two men for one until his noble little army, now no longer reinforced, should come to an end. Lee took four men instead
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
d his daughters, 327. Randolph Wm., Distinguished Descendents of, 135. Ray, Rev. George H., Address of, 392. Reams's Station, Battle at, 113. Richmond College, Geographical and Historical Society of, 125. Richmond, Evacuation of, 330; Social Life in, 380. Richmond Fayette Artillery, 57. Richmond Home Guard, 57. Robins, Major W. M., 164. Robinson Leigh, His noble Address on General Joseph E. Johnston: 337. Saddle, General in the, 167; Grant, Lee, Meade, 168; Warren, Burnside, McClellan, Sherman, 169; Hooker. Kilpatrick, Sickles, Hampton, 170; B F. Butler, John Pope, Sheridan, 171; Pleasanton, Hancock, Logan, 172; Stonewall Jackson, Stuart, McClellan, Kearney, 173; Ord, Wallace, Early, Banks, Terry, 174. Scheibert, Major J on Jefferson Davis, 406. Schools, Free in Virginia, 138. Secession of Southern States, Order of the, 412. Sherwood. Grace, Trial of for witchcraft, 131. Slavery in the South, 393; Elements of in Virginia. 135. Smith, J. C