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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
earance in a short time over the crest of that hill. Then sir, we will give them the bayonet, was the only reply of Colonel Jackson. With a salute, General Bee wheeled his horse and disappeared down the hill, where he immortalized himself, Colonel Jackson and his troops, by his memorable words to his own command: Close up, men, and stand your ground. Colonel Jackson with five regiments of Virginia troops is standing behind us like a stonewall, and will support you. Thus was the name of Stonewall given to General Jackson and his famous brigade. General Bee was killed the next moment. Our entire line lay in the pine thickets for one long hour, and no man, unless he was there, can tell how very long it was to us. Under fire from two batteries throwing time-shells only, they did not do a great amount of killing, but it was terribly demoralizing. Then there was a welcome cessation; and we were wondering why, and when the fighting would begin for us. After nearly half an hour the roa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
ch it treats. But if it may be permitted one who counts it a high honor to have been one of Stonewall's men to recall some personal reminiscences and anecdotes illustrative of the character of ourhis name with one of deathless fame, and Thomas Jonathan Jackson was to be known henceforth as Stonewall Jackson. One of the few, the immortal names That were not born to die. But this soubriquet of Stonewall, though it has passed into history and will cling to him forever, is really a very inappropriate designation for this impetuous soldier, whose watchword was Forward or Charge ratherof Tennessee. How it would have resulted I may not now discuss, but it is safe to say that if Stonewall Jackson had been in command of those heroic veterans, there would have been less retreating anery at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia, and two continents were bursting with the fame of Stonewall Jackson. Jackson gave a great deal of time to his colored Sunday school. He was accustomed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
The soubriquet Stonewall. how it was acquired. [from the Richmond Dispatch, July 29, 1891.] A few more years will forever seal the lips of all who can speak from personal knowledge of the incidents of the War Between the States. Any of them, therefore, who can now contribute to the perfect accuracy of history may be pardones is my only motive for troubling you with this brief article. I am one of those who heard General Barnard E. Bee utter the words which gave Jackson the name of Stonewall. The exact facts. The speech of General Early (as I have seen it reported) at Lexington on the 21st instant is slightly inaccurate in its account of this matter in two particulars. As this inaccuracy does injustice to other Confederate soldiers no less gallant than the Stonewall brigade, I am sure the chivalric old General and all others like him, with hearts in the right place, will be glad to have it corrected and the exact facts stated. The Fourth Alabama. It was to the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
oward the threatened part of his line of battle. Then he was magnificent. His hat jammed down over his eyes, his eyes bright and his long moustache waving in the air gave him an odd look, while the terrific pace of his steed was appalling. He overcame every obstacle with ease, and it was a beautiful sight to see his horse go flying over fences, ditches or fallen trees, while the rider sat in the saddle with ease and apparent reckless indifference. Lieutenant-General Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson was a great horseman. He sat in the saddle easily, while there was a sort of abandon visible which showed his familiarity with horseflesh from boyhood. His seat was very erect, and though it had none of the stiffness of the cavalry style, it was very correct. His stirrups were shortened to give a slight bend to the knee and enable him to adjust his body to the movements of his steed without apparent exertion. Major-General James Ewell Brown Stuart (best known as Jeb, from th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Thomas J. Jackson. (search)
Guire, Chief surgeon of the Second corps of the army of Northern Virginia. The following sketch of the distinguished surgeon, Dr. Hunter McGuire, with his highly interesting reminiscences of his friend and commander, General Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson, appeared in the issue of the Richmond Dispatch of July 19, 1891, preceding the unveiling at Lexington, Va., on July 21st of the bronze statue by the Virginia sculptor, Edward V. Valentine, of the great soldier: Characteristics of Jhis day by hard fighting. He was full of emotion when he turned around to me and said: No, sir, we have won this day by the blessing of Almighty God. The scene at Manassas. I would like to hear your story of how Jackson got the name of Stonewall, said the reporter. The Stonewall brigade arrived at Manassas Junction late in the evening of July 20, 1861, replied the Doctor. We got there after dark, camped alongside the road, and next morning at daylight started to march in the di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
nflexible, The British Iron-Clad, Description of, 32 Iron, Manufacture in Virginia, Early, 137. Jackson, General Thomas J., Characteristics of, 83; at prayer, 111, 161; personal reminiscences and anecdotes of, 145, 298; how the sobriquet Stonewall was acquired, 83, 153, 164, 307; in the saddle, 173; at the Virginia Military Institute, 273; personal description of, 302; kindness of, 308; sketch of, 315; the coat in which he was wounded, 324: moral influence of, 371, 398. Johnson's Islaeral Joseph E. Johnston: 337. Saddle, General in the, 167; Grant, Lee, Meade, 168; Warren, Burnside, McClellan, Sherman, 169; Hooker. Kilpatrick, Sickles, Hampton, 170; B F. Butler, John Pope, Sheridan, 171; Pleasanton, Hancock, Logan, 172; Stonewall Jackson, Stuart, McClellan, Kearney, 173; Ord, Wallace, Early, Banks, Terry, 174. Scheibert, Major J on Jefferson Davis, 406. Schools, Free in Virginia, 138. Secession of Southern States, Order of the, 412. Sherwood. Grace, Tria