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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
The Artillery defenders of Fort Gregg. A correction. Captain W. S. Chew of Maryland, not Colonel Chew of Virginia. New Orleans, La., 7th September, 1892. Mr. R. A. Brock, Secretary Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: dear Sir—In my article on the Artillery Defence of Fort Gregg, published in Vol. XIX, Southern Historical Society Papers (pp. 65-71), I find that I was in error as to the artillery officer named Chew, who was in the fort when the assault was made. It was not Colonel Chew of Virginia, an officer of tried and distinguished gallantry, but Captain W. S. Chew, Fourth Maryland, who was there, but not in command. I, therefore, tender my apology to Colonel Chew for the error I made unintentionally. Very sincerely, W. Miller Owen, Late Lieutenant-Colonel Artillery, A. N. V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of Company D. First regiment Virginia Cavalry, C. S. A. (search)
r captured, the name being so defaced I can't tell who it was. On the 28th, E. W. Roe was killed; Corporal T. W. Colley, wounded. At Louisa Courthouse, a few days after, I am satisfied we saved the division from defeat, and later on the evening of the same day, at Trevillian's, held the key to our position until Fitz Lee could make his flank movement, which resulted in a victory over Sheridan and his cavalry corps. Twenty-four men of First Squadron, Companys D and K (Company K were from Maryland) at Mrs. Stewart's Tavern, Little River Turnpike, above Germantown, the morning after the second battle of Manassas, captured one captain, one lieutenant and fifty-four privates of the Fifth Regulars, U. S. A., a company commanded by General Fitz Lee before he resigned and joined his mother State. In the whole of the campaign, from the Rappahannock to the James, for about sixty days (for it lasted longer with the cavalry than with the infantry), we had no rest. The horses, half fed and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
e heat of the quarrel, makes conflicting statements. Johnston, in summing up, argues that the Confederates were too weak for offensive operations, yet at the Fairfax conference, September 30, we find him perfectly willing, apparently, to invade Maryland with an army of sixty thousand men. And he makes cause against the president for professing to be unable to reinforce the army to that extent. This point he cites to show that the president was never willing to give him force enough and that when properly equipped he favored aggression. It is not probable, however, that Johnston was really anxious to invade Maryland. Four weeks later his effective force was forty-seven thousand two hundred, and on December 31, 1861, fifty-seven thousand three hundred and thirty-seven, yet he made no offensive movement. But relative conditions may have changed. The Antietam and Gettysburg campaigns in the East and the Bragg and Hood invasions in the West undeniably demonstrate the correctness of Joh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Medical history of the Confederate States Army and Navy (search)
as follows: Infantry.Cavalry.Artillery. Alabama573 Arkansas346 Florida93 Georgia6710 Kentucky119 Louisiana3411 Maryland1 Mississippi5151 Missouri156 North Carolina6054 South Carolina3373 Tennessee7012 Texas2232 Virginia64194 Confeen addressed to the Governors of the Southern States, namely: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia: Circular no. 2. Office of h, 10 west Ninth street. Kentucky—L. Y. Green, Lookout Mountain. Louisiana—W. L. Gahagan, 10 west Ninth street. Maryland—E. A. Cobleigh, 729 Chestnut street. Mississippi—N. C. Steele, 722 east Seventh street. Missouri—H. L. McReynolds,ropriations on a more liberal scale, for the extention and maintenance of this humane and deserving institution. State of Maryland. Respectfully returned, and attention invited to remarks of General Johnson. No organizations of Confede
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
109; total, 9,474. August melts itself away, and Indian summer hangs its veil of film-like witchery over the hills of Maryland, my Maryland. Pope has been replaced, and McClellan controls the united armies of the James and the Potomac. Lee's armMaryland. Pope has been replaced, and McClellan controls the united armies of the James and the Potomac. Lee's army, after a series of minor conflicts, finds itself brought to bay on the plateau between the Antietam and the Potomac. It is a glorious battlefield for armies of equal strength. It was full of danger to the smaller army, with a great river in its r. P. Hill, from his left and center, and Burnside is hurled back with great loss. 'Tis the bloodiest day in the ides of Maryland. The September frost had already painted the forest with crimson-war had that day left her carmine footprints on her soen including West Virginia) furnished to the Federal army 86,009 white troops, while the slave-holding States, Kentucky, Maryland and Missouri, which never formally seceded, furnished to the Federal army 190,430 white soldiers, and the negro populati
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
Favored as long as profitable. I fail to find the evidence that property in man was an obnoxious doctrine at the North until property in man wholly ceased there to be lucrative. Small as the number of slaves necessarily was to the north of Maryland, in several of them slavery existed for more than fifty years after the adoption of the Constitution. Where the interest was so limited and the emancipation so gradual, no great shock to society could well occur, especially as in the bulk of caent scale from anything which ever existed in the North, was the problem which confronted the South—springing from no choice or voice of her own, but against her choice and against her voice. In 1830 there were movements in Tennessee, Kentucky, Maryland and Virginia for the gradual emancipation of their slaves, and in Virginia the movement had nearly succeeded. It was the aggression of the Abolitionists which arrested the movement in all these States. The problem at the North. Connecticu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
hey can do is to fight their battles over. They staked all on the South's great issue and lost all save life. Those who are able to perform physical labor police the grounds and wait upon the sick in the hospital. The entire premises are regularly inspected twice a week. Since the establishment of the Home it has cared for 484 veterans. In addition to Virginians there have been on the rolls: From New Jersey, 1; South Carolina, 7; Georgia, 2; West Virginia, 5; District of Columbia, 2; Maryland, 3; North Carolina, 5; Florida, 1; Alabama, I; Tennessee, 1; Texas, 1, and Mississippi, 1. As may well be imagined, the number of deaths in proportion to the inmates has been very large. The present roll. The present roll embraces one hundred and sixty-six men, and the dates of their admission, their names, and their commands are as follows: November 22, 1887, William Aldridge, E, Thirteenth Virginia Cavalry. March 22, 1890, William J. Atkinson, Second Houston. July 26, 1890,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
a soldiers when the Society of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States, of Maryland, headed by the Great Southern Band with about thirty pieces, fell into line bereunions of the survivors of every army of the Confederacy as they gather from Maryland to Texas. But it is for me always a peculiar pleasure to attend a Confederaut a murmur, and with his three regiments reported to General Arnold Elzey, of Maryland, who had just been promoted, and whose old regiment, the First Maryland unitede Westmoreland and Commonwealth clubs. The Marylanders were pleased. The Maryland veterans who took part in the unveiling ceremonies were delighted beyond measuimed in his characteristic way: Well, I declare! I believe that if all of you Maryland fellows were to die except one, that fellow would come down here with a brass le here they were introduced to the daughters and neices of General Hill. The Maryland band gave the distinguished Southern ladies a beautiful serenade, which was gr