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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 41 41 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 10 10 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 21st, 1861 AD or search for July 21st, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] (search)
al of twenty-seven, a few more than one-third of the whole. Eleven of these volunteer comrades have died since the war, leaving thirty-four living. Many changes took place during the four years of service, both among commissioned and non-commissioned officers, and very many of those whose names appear as privates arose, some to the dignity of commissioned and others to that of non-commissioned officers. Company D participated in the battles of Falling Waters, July 2, 1861; Manassas, July 21, 1861; Kernstown, March 23, 1862; Winchester (Bank's defeat), May 25, 1862; Port Republic, June 9, 1862; Cold Harbor, June 27, 1862; Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862; Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862; Second Manassas, August 28, 29 and 30, 1862: Harper's Ferry, September 15, 1862; Antietam, September 17, 1862; Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863; Winchester (Milroy's defeat), June 13, 1863; Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; Mine Run, November 7, 1863; Wilderness, May 5 and 6, 1864
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The bloody angle. (search)
rank of brigadier-general, and assigned to the Command of Winder's brigade; and it was called Paxton's brigade until he was killed at Chancellorsville in May, 1863. Then I was assigned to its command, and for a few weeks only it was known as Walker's brigade; when, by authority of the Secretary of War, it received the official designation of Stonewall brigade, by which it had been unofficially known in the army before, and which name it had received on the plains of Manassas on the 21st of July, 1861, when the brave Bee pointed to the First Virginia brigade, under command of General Jackson, and said to his brave men, retiring, before overwhelming odds: There stands Jackson and his Virginians like a stone wall. The compliment was paid to the brigade for its gallant stand as much as to its commander. On the 12th of May, 1864, in the Bloody Angle, the old brigade was annihilated, and its name faded from the rolls of the Army of Northern Virginia, but it will ever live on the roll