Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Augusta (Georgia, United States) or search for Augusta (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] (search)
The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] Of Company D of the Fifth Virginia regiment, of the Stonewall Brigade. In the early part of the spring of the year 1860 a volunteer infantry company was formed at Middlebrook in this county (Augusta), which organized under the name of Southern Guards, as follows: Captain, H. J. Williams, now living at Greenville. First Lieutenant, W. C. McKemy, died since the war. Second Lieutenant, W. H. Randolph, killed at Richmond, 1862. Third Lieutenant, S. M. Helms, living at Steele's Tavern. Sergeants. S. F. Carson, died since the war. J. B. McCutchan, living at Middlebrook. G. S. Boon, living at Staunton. John W. Gabbert, killed at Cedar Mountain, 1862. John H. Wright, killed at Fort Steadman. Corporals. C. C. Cochran, killed at Chancellorsville, 1863. John H. Zimmerman, died prisoner at Fort Delaware, 1864. Matthias Fix, living at Middlebrook. James Gabbert, killed at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memorial address (search)
ve the cause in any capacity. The repeated and urgent requests of both Johnston and Beauregard that Hill should be restored to command, resulted at last in his assignment to duty at Charleston, from which place he fell back with our forces to Augusta. When the remnant of the grand army of Tennessee reached Augusta in charge of General Stevenson, Johnston ordered Hill to assume command and move in front of the vast and victorious hosts of Sherman. The greeting given him by the little bandAugusta in charge of General Stevenson, Johnston ordered Hill to assume command and move in front of the vast and victorious hosts of Sherman. The greeting given him by the little bands of the old legions of Cleburne and Breckinridge now left, was a fitting tribute to an old commander whom they loved and admired. Hoping against hope, Hill was the leader above all others to infuse new spirit into the forlorn band devoted to this desperate duty. At every stream and on every eminence in his native State he disputed the ground with Sherman's vanguard till he developed a force that made it madness to contend further. Hill's reputation as a soldier depends in nowise upon succes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The gold and silver in the Confederate States Treasury. (search)
deliberation and a consultation with some of the citizens of Washington, I determined to go to Augusta. Heard of the surrender. On the 18th of April, or thereabouts, we left in the train, and pass, we heard of General Lee's surrender. This we did not at the time credit. We arrived at Augusta in due time, and I made my report to General D. B. Fry, the commanding general. General Fry infemained in the cars, and the midshipman and the Charlotte company lived in the depot. While in Augusta, and afterwards, I was frequently advised by officious persons to divide the money among the Co would be held intact until we met President Davis. Declined to disband. While waiting in Augusta I received a telegraphic dispatch from Mr. Mallory directing me to disband my command; but undeble that President Davis would hear of Mrs. Davis being left in Abbeville. Accordingly we left Augusta on the 23d, arrived at Washington the same day, formed a train again, and started for Abbeville