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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 54 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 50 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 38 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) or search for Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How the Confederacy changed naval Warfare. (search)
ate forts, ordered: Pass the order to fire no shot at those boats saving drowning men. These are the chivalries which make war glorious. While their stationary, defensive torpedoes were so destructive, Confederate ingenuity was active in creating aggressive torpedo boats, which, making no noise nor smoke, and lying deep in the water, could, at night, approach and sink a ship at anchor. The United States frigate Ironsides was the greatest ironclad then in existence. She lay in Charleston harbor, and was an object of great desire to the young Confederate naval officers. And one night Lieutenant Glassell, of Virginia, went out to attack her. His boat was the torpedo David. She was made of boiler-iron, was cigar-shaped, was noiseless and smokeless, and bore a torpedo in her bow. Her crew were Glassell, a pilot, and an engineer. She approached her great adversary, which loomed grandly up against the sky, without discovery till close aboard. Glassell stood in the hatch
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The prison experience of a Confederate soldier. (search)
and other officers of lower rank. After the arrival of these officers in Charleston harbor they were kept aboard a vessel for several days, and then, instead of lanently believed by all that another exchange would be effected on reaching Charleston harbor, and every one was anxious to go. The cartel for the exchange of prisoht they were spies and others thought they would be exchanged on reaching Charleston harbor, but they were not. They were kept with us throughout the entire retaliatpe of these helpless prisoners whilst the Crescent was coasting around to Charleston harbor, from fifty to a hundred miles from land, the Government considerately fuere afterwards informed. Without further incident or delay, we reached Charleston harbor in due time, and the Crescent anchored inside the bar, close to the Feders, the prisoners being still confined to the hold, the vessel returned to Charleston harbor and anchored near her former position, and we were kept aboard two or thr