hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
Zzzgeneral Joseph E. Johnston's Campaign in Georgia. Lt.-General Leonidas Polk at Cassville. Criticisms of Gen. S. G. French. In the last volume of Southern Historical Society Papers (Xxi), pp. 314-321, there was republished from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, of Oct. 22, 1893, an article under the above caption. To this article Major-General S. G. French took exceptions in a reply, published in the Picayune, of Dec. 28, 1893. It is the mission of the Southern Historical Society to seek the truth as to every detail in the grand struggle of the South, and to place it upon record in its Papers. The reply of General French is from a corrected copy, considerately furnished by him. General French desired the statement, to be made in this connection, that his Division was composed of the brigades of Generals Cockrell, Sears and Ector. He continues: I had placed Cockrell's brigade on a range of hills early in the afternoon; now, when General Johnston formed his line of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
nt of the Atlantic, including the States of Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Medical Director, Hunter McGuire, M. D., Richmond, Va., formerly surgeon of the Cogeon and editor of Confederate States Medical Journal, Richmond, Va., 1864-65. Department of Georgia—James B. Read, M. D., Savannah, Ga., formerly in charge of Officers' Hospital, Richmond, Va., Crs, A. B. M. Miller, M. D., lately deceased, Atlanta, Ga., formerly chief surgeon Department of Georgia, C. S. A.; J. McF. Gaston, M. D., Atlanta, Ga., formerly surgeon P. A. C. S.; G. E. Flewellen, II. Department of the Atlantic includes Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Florida. Medical Director, Hunter McGuire, M. D., Richmond, Va. III. Department of the G Medical Inspectors, A. M. Talley, M. D., and Middleton Michel, M. D., Charleston, S. C. IX. Georgia—Medical Director, James B. Read, M. D., Savannah, Ga.; Medical Inspectors, A. B. M. Miller, M.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
on to historical facts, which refute allegations made upon this floor, that the responsibility of the war rested altogether upon the southern people. When the people of the South settled on the shores of Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia, they had no intention of encouraging or even tolerating the institution of slavery. The thrifty New England seamen, in their voyages to the Indies and other countries, saw its practical operation, and solely with the view of profit in the trry. Oglethorpe and his colonists were possibly the most determined in resisting the importation, sale and use of African slaves; and for twenty years they were successful in the enforcement of the law which prohibited the landing of slaves in Georgia. Finally, together with the other Southern States, they succumbed, and the New England ship owners amassed fortunes by plying the business of buying negroes in Africa, transporting them to the United States, and selling them for the most part
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead in Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, Va. Memorial services, June 6, 1894. (search)
in Jack brought his flowers, as usual. Virginia, first and second rows, Mrs. John Lewis, Misses Olie Striker, Brookie Ford, Mamie Fuller, Kate Lewis; third row, Misses Lucy and Minnie Jones; fourth row, Misses Gettie and Laura McGuire; fifth row, Mrs. John McCoy and daughters; sixth row, Misses Nannie Krebs, Mary and Louisa Clark and Carrie Brent; seventh and eighth rows, Misses Nannie and Lilly Boyd, Mrs. Worthington, Miss L. D. Williams; ninth row, Misses Mary Tidball and Annie Conrad. Georgia, Mrs. Peter Kurtz, Mrs. V. W. Striker, Misses Vie Smith, Katie Trier, Mary and Lizzie Striker; Unknown Monument, Miss Belle Hollis and sisters, the Misses Simms; Texas, Mrs. Wm. Byrd and daughters; Arkansas, the Misses Mesmer and Mrs. Thomas Mesmer; Kentucky, Miss Mary and Miss Julia Kurtz, and little Mary Faulkner; Maryland, Misses Nellie, Kate and Mary Cover; Louisiana, Mrs. Geo. Grim and daughters, Mrs. Geo. Taylor and daughters, Misses Evie Haymaker, Lula Haymaker, Emma Wigginton and Ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
e was born on the River Yadkin, in Wilkes County, N. C., August 27th, 1805, and at the time of her death was doubtless the oldest person in Shelby County. Her mother's maiden name was Charity King. Her father, Chapman Gordon, served in the Revolutionary War, under Generals Marion and Sumter. She came of a long-lived race of people. Her mother lived to be ninety-three years of age, and her brother, Rev. Hezekiah Herndon Gordon, who was the father of Gen. John B. Gordon, now Senator from Georgia, lived to the age of ninety-two years. Sallie Chapman Gordon was married to Dr. John S. Law, near Eatonton, Ga., on the 28th of June, 1825. A few years later she became a member of the Presbyterian Church, in Forsyth, Ga., and her name was afterward transferred to the rolls of the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis, of which church she remained a member as long as she lived. She became an active worker in hospitals, and when nothing more could be done in Memphis she went through t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of honorable R. T. Bennett, late Colonel 13th North Carolina Infantry, C. S. A. (search)
ve. If the courage of these Confederates, who stepped from their homes into the army and were soldiers, was admirable, the principles for which they contended cannot be over stated. The right of local self-government lay at the very root of the struggle and conflict between the government and the Confederate States. The natural leaders of the South, trained in correct methods of observation and reasoning, in politics, saw the impending danger and gave the alarm. Mr. Crawford, of Georgia, advised secession on the part of the South as early as 1820. There was no doubt then about the right of a State to secede from the Union. Rawle, the Pennsylvanian, in his book on the Constitution, says: The secession of a State from the Union depends on the will of the people of such State. The States then may wholly withdraw from the Union, but while they continue they must retain the character of representative republics. Tucker, of Virginia, is as explicit as Rawle on this
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
The heroism of Huger, Kennon, Warley, Read, and others at the capture of New Orleans, fully attest the morale of the naval service, and the promise of its efficiency in a larger field, with better means of offensive action. Semmes in the Sumter and Alabama, Maffit in the Florida, with a bare handful of men, stricken with yellow fever, running the blockade of Mobile in the broad daylight, there refitting and passing again through the Federal fleet. Pegram in the Nashville, Maury in the Georgia, Wood in the Tallahassee, Wilkinson in the Chicamauga, Waddell in the Shenandoah, Read in the sailing ships Clarence, Tacony, and Archer, denied all rights in foreign ports, save those of belligerents, swept the seas bare of American commerce, and inflicted a damage the country has never recovered. In 1860, two-thirds of the commerce of America was carried in American bottoms. In 1863, three-fourths had been transferred to English registers. Zzzthe Alabama Claims. The injury thus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
ordered to report to Medical-Director, Headquarters A. T., Dalton. April 21, ‘64, ordered to report to Lieutenant-General Hardee, April 30, ‘64, 1st Confederate Georgia. Cole, S. S., contract. Contract made by Colonel Bennett Nov 1, ‘62, Feb. 28, ‘63, Col. Bennett's Cavalry, March 31, 63. Covey, E. N., A. and I. G. O., Ri 24, ‘62, July 31, ‘64, 30th Alabama Regiment, Oct. 13, Resaca, Ga. Carter, J. A., Surgeon, Aug. 31, ‘64, 1st Georgia Regiment, S. L. Remained with Regiment in Georgia. Cumming, H. M., Assistant Surgeon, May 31, ‘64, 63d Georgia Regiment. Ordered to report for 30 days to Brigadier-General Fry, commanding Post at Augusta. No. 264. Granted leave for thirty days. Douglass, P. W., Surgeon. June 30, ‘64, 2d Georgia State Line. Sept. 16, sent to Hospital sick, Oct. command to State of Georgia. Dysart, B. G., Surgeon. June 30, ‘64, 3d and 5th Missouri Regiments, Senior Surgeon Cockrell's Brigade, Dec. ‘64, left with wounded at Fr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hospitals and Medical officers in charge, attached to the Army of Tennessee, July, 1864. (search)
ospital, Surgeon J. W. Osten. Zzzcolumbus, Georgia. Walker Hospital, Surgeon Carlisle Terry. Zzzgreensboro, Georgia. Dawson Hospital, Surgeon J. D. Smith. Zzzmilledgeville, Georgia.ospital, Surgeon J. McF. Gaston. Zzzmacon, Georgia. City Hall Hospital, Surgeons L. L. Saundestant Surgeon C. H. Tebault. Zzzsimsville, Georgia. Polk Hospital, Surgeon Robert Battey. Zzzaugusta, Georgia. Asylum Hospital, Surgeon H. H. Clayton. Zzzforsythe, Georgia. Gilmer ospital, E. N. Hughes, Surgeon. Zzzathens, Georgia. Ophthalmic Hospital, Surgeon Bolling A. Png Surgeon Lewis A. Bryan. Zzzbarnesville, Georgia. Kingsville Hospital, Surgeon B. N. Avent.ph A. Groves and B. N. Avent. Zzzcuthbert, Georgia. Hood Hospital, Surgeon V. H. Morrison. Hspital, John W. Glenn, Surgeon. Zzzmilner, Georgia. Medical College Hospital, Surgeon Willis y Hospital, J. Cecil Legare. Zzzpineville, Georgia. Empire Hospital, Surgeon Wm. P. Harden. [15 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
and Sheridan at Winchester, with 43,000, the enemy holding, as President Davis says in his history, precisely the same position in the Valley which he had before the beginning of the campaign in the spring. Meantime, Sherman had marched through Georgia, and was at Savannah. Zzzwaynesboro'and the end. On the 27th of February Sheridan started from Winchester with his cavalry, Early having Rosser, with a few hundred men, and Wharton's two small brigades and Nelson's Artillery, to meet him. eracy and the collapse of its finances, had changed the face of affairs. With Mississippi, Kentucky and Tennessee overrun, the Trans-Mississippi cut from us, and the lower basin useless, the enemy could concentrate at will against our forces in Georgia and Virginia. Second. The Valley was a garden and a granary when Jackson fought. Early fought in a desert, where the crow flying over it would have to carry his rations. He had to practice the art of Napoleon—scatter to subsist, and concen
1 2