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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,057 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 106 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 72 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 70 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 67 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 58 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 54 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George Washington or search for George Washington in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
essional character, to say to you and to all, that the law of 1850 is decidedly more favorable to the fugitive than General Washington's law of 1793.* * Such is the present law, and, much opposed and maligned as it is, it is more favorable to the fugople to action; the pen of Jefferson, to write the Declaration that we were a free and independent people; the sword of Washington, to win the battles which made us one of the nations of the earth; and it also furnished Chief-Justice Marshall, to proclaim the principles upon which American jurisprudence and civil liberty are founded. They were southern with Washington who crossed the Alleghanies, one hundred and forty-one years ago, to defend the pioneers who were braving the dangers of the wned right of a State to secede from the Union. At the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of the inauguration of Washington, April 30, 1839, ex-President John Quincy Adams delivered an address which was received with great approval by the peop
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
and future ages the valor of our men, there is nothing in marble, granite or brass to immortalize the courage, fortitude—nay, heroism of the women of the South. Only a few weeks ago a monument was completed to the memory of the mother of George Washington, about one hundred years after it ought to have been done, and at last, mainly through the exertions of her own sex. It is to ask you to-night that I come to aid a movement that shall give to the women of the Southern Confederacy a monumefore the sun sinks into his ocean bed, let his last rays from the West, coming across ocean and continent, passing over the city of the dead (Hollywood) and of the living (Richmond), light up the heroic forms in bronze of Robert E. Lee and George Washington, forming, as they reach the Confederate soldier and the Confederate woman, through the falling rain, a gorgeous rainbow, spanning the whole eastern sky, a heavenly crown for the brave man and lovely woman standing there, glorious in the bow
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
hmond's towers and steeples, they threw down their guns and refused to charge, saying and acting, from general to private, that it was worse than useless for them to attack these veterans of the Army of Northern Virginia, and Grant sent word to Washington that his army would fight no more, and that preparations for peace had best be begun, and the chief authorities there so ordered. What better evidence of the great superiority of our soldiers could be adduced, and that too, from those who befoied position in our own line, in Longstreet's flank and rear, with nothing between him and Williamsburg, or between him and Longstreet's road of retreat. Had these timid division commanders, of West Point, pursuing, as McClellan telegraphed to Washington, a routed and flying foe, but followed up the advantage thus promptly seized upon by General Hancock, they might at once have occupied the road in Longstreet's rear, and cut him off completely. But though in hot pursuit till they came up with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
report to General Wheeler, 7th Alabama Cavalry. Appointed to rank Dec. 20, ‘62, reported to Medical-Director, April 30, ‘64, 7th Alabama Regiment. Currey, Geo. Washington, Surgeon, appointed by Secretary War to rank May 14, ‘62. Dec. 31, Catoosa Springs, Jan. 31, ‘63, Ringgold, Ga. Passed Board at Charleston, S. C., Aug. 13, ‘6 Powell, Albert A., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank from Aug. 27, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, attache Medical-Director's Office. Posey, George Washington, detailed. Dec. 31, ‘62, Ringgold, Georgia. Prout, W. H., Assistant Surgeon, Ferel's Battery. Portwood, W. A., Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secreta, Assistant Surgeon. May 18, 1863, ordered to report to Medical-Director A. J. F., May 24, ‘63, ordered to report to F. A. Ross, Medical-Director. Tribble, Geo. Washington, Assistant Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of War to rank July 18, ‘63. Passed Board at Chattanooga July 18, ‘63. July 31, ‘63, 6th, 10th, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
4 had its beginning yonder at Cold Harbor, in sight of the spires of Richmond. From May 5th to June 3d, Grant, with 138,000 men, and Lee, with 52,000, had wrestled with each other from the Rapidan to the Chickahominy. Grant had telegraphed to Washington, May 11, that he would fight it out on that line if it took all summer. On May 12th, that the enemy seems to have found the last ditch, and on May 26th, that Lee is really whipped. But now June 3d had dawned, and as he hurled his masses, six who had started to Richmond and landed at White Sulphur Springs, the Ohio river, and finally at Monocacy. He asked Hunter an embarrassing question: Where is the enemy? He replied that he did not know, and was so embarrassed with orders from Washington that he had lost all trace of the enemy. Grant told him that Sheridan was in Washington with one cavalry division and another on the way, and suggested that he (Hunter) should make headquarters, at Cumberland, Baltimore, or elsewhere and give
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
et Hard by each door—the door of old or young,— That glory can be wrested from defeat, Let an ‘Io Triumphe!’ here be sung, Yielding the meed of praise,— Of laurels and green bays— To young and old alike who fought in those lost days. III. Brighter than any born of time or fate— More beautiful than e'er beheld of men— Fronting the nations stood the fair young State; And ‘Rebel’ was the splendid badge again Worn by the sons of those Whom Freedom's feudal foes Had learned to bow before when Washington arose. IV. They gathered around her beautiful bright form With glittering bayonets fixed to ready guns, Stirred by that passion Liberty keeps warm In every pulse of all her patriot sons, Offering upon her shrine The sacrifice divine Of Love; and each man swore ‘Her holy cause is mine!’ V. Her cause was their's and Freedom's. For such cause Men have died gladly since that ancient day When the Three Hundred gave a Myriad pause For Grecian freedom at Thermopylae; These d