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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Present: (search)
urists said and say it had a valid title; look at the gift made by Maryland, North Carolina's donation of Tennessee, and Georgia's cession froion of the earth: then draw a line along the northern boundary of Maryland and due west toward the Mississippi river, then northward to the Ceep up the Atlantic shores by Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia and Maryland, to the beginning point! Look, my countrymen, at that wondrous imof free people—that land came into the Union by the munificence of Maryland, Virginia, the Carolinas and Georgia; it was won from the crowns o given her sons to the common cause, she fought on to the finish. Maryland furnished twenty thousand men, South Carolina thirty-one thousand, the free exercise of religious worship, was in the organic law of Maryland. The Carolinas, North and South, in 1670 made a bold fight for hoof Massachusetts is the cause of all rang like a liberty bell from Maryland to Georgia. Virginia in the lead, called for a Congress of Deputi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
, was complimented for gallantry at every turn; it bore a distinguished name for unbounded courage. This battery, with its infantry support, successfully resisted at Gettysburg a charge of Federal cavalry, and saved the army transportation. General Farnsworth, the Federal commander, who led the cavalry charge, rather than surrender himself, blew out his own brains on the field of battle. So this battery traversed nearly every military road in Virginia; crossed the Potomac, fought in Maryland and Pennsylvania; was ordered back to South Carolina, and aided by an enviable courage to close the career of the Confederacy. Heretofore in these pages an allusion has been made to the Charleston Light Dragoons. This is an old and time-honored corps, dating back to 1773, when it was named the Charles-Town City Troops, and did active service then as a company, and in halcyon days as gay and gallant Dragoons, on Muster Day and as an escort for governors. They went to Virginia as a Kid G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
orse, at sight of which some of our animals were greatly excited. Our battery pressed on some three miles at a trot till about dark, when it reached the hill south of the Potomac, overlooking the village of Hancock, which lay near the river, in Maryland. The enemy, after passing through Bath, had divided, some going westward by the road to Sir John's Run, and some toward Hancock, and were pursued by our troops on both roads. The battery engaged the artillery of the enemy that night and renewehur Robinson died December 23d, from wound received at Fredericksbnrg December 13, 1862. J. P. Heiskell, discharged November 2, 1863. Edgar S. Alexander, discharged November 16, 1863. Henry B. Gibson, transferred November 3d, to Company D, Maryland battalion. Charles Minor, who joined November 16, 1861, transferred November 3d to Company A, First engineer regiment. near Barboursville, Va., April 30, 1864. Battery remained at Frederick Hall from December 31, 1863, till February 6,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Donaldsonville artillery at the battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
t who led the way and Jackson who struck the blow, and it may be doubted whether the dashing cavalry raid or the brilliant infantry attack had more to do with the successful result. Later in the same year Stuart performed a still greater feat. Whilst McClellan was pursuing Lee southward after the battle of Antietam creek, Stuart, with 2,000 picked troopers and half a dozen light guns, stole round the right wing of the Federals, crossed the Potomac a little north of Williamsport, entered Maryland, passed rapidly through Mercersburg and Chambersburg, and finally recrossed the Potomac about fifteen miles from Washington, far to the left of McClellan's army, with the loss of one killed and seven wounded. The result of his raid was the capture of a number of prisoners, the destruction of vast stores of supplies and arms, and the transfer to Virginia of two or three thousand valuable horses. By this time, however, the Yankees had taken a lesson from Stuart's successes, and had raised a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Events leading up to the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
Potomac, and with the remainder to cross into Maryland and place himself on the right of General Ewe rear, you can move with the other three into Maryland and take position on General Ewell's right. ecessary instructions. All supplies taken in Maryland must be by authorized staff officers for theies of his force, to move the other three into Maryland and take position on General Ewell's right, pd be made by General Stuart was to cross into Maryland, and put himself on the right of General Ewelave the army for the purpose of crossing into Maryland, as directed by General Lee's letter, unless my's rear to reach the Potomac and cross into Maryland. Now, it must be borne in mind that this sugt them, but I think the sooner you cross into Maryland after to-morrow the better. The movements ofly over, and the entire command bivouacked on Maryland soil. * * * * Difficult to occupy. I sherceived, left the army which had passed into Maryland with no cavalry, except the brigade of Jenkin[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
une 22, 1863. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart, Commanding Cavalry, &c.. General,—I have just received your note of 7:45 this morning to General Longstreet. I judge the efforts of the enemy yesterday were to arrest our progress and ascertain our whereabouts. I fear he will steal a march on us, and get across the Potomac before we are aware. If you find that he is moving northward, and that two brigades can guard the Blue Ridge and take care of your rear, you can move the other three into Maryland, and take position on Ewell's right, place yourself in communication with him, guard his flank, and keep him informed of the enemy's movements, and collect all the supplies you can for the use of the army. One column of General Ewell's army will probably move towards the Susquehanna by the Emmittsburg route, another by Chambersburg. Stuart is here given discretion as to the route he should go; but the orders to leave Longstreet and go to Ewell are peremptory. Stuart's headquarters wer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How the Southern soldiers kept House during the war. (search)
washed for many of the officers, attended to his ambulance horse, and mine, and arose at daybreak. He was one of the cleanest and most honest cooks, and what was most gratifying, he loved me better than anybody in this world. I advised him soon after the war began to get married. Take notice, my young friends, I believe in everybody of any account getting married; but be certain you don't marry in haste and repent at leisure. Joe was no soldier. He knew his business. When we went into Maryland and Pennsylvania I became very uneasy lest he should make a break for liberty. I kept my eye on him. To lose him would be to lose my right hand. On the second day's fight at Gettysburg I saw Joe coming across the field at full speed. I never saw him in such fright, and he said to me, out of breath: Marse William, I thought dey had me! Who? I asked. Dem Yankees, pointing to the thousands of Federal prisoners on their way to Libby Prison. I was greatly relieved. I had no more fear of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
ll. Indian Territory-One brigadier-general (Stand Watie). France—One major-general (Camille J. Polignac). Arkansas—Four major-generals and eighteen brigadier-generals— twenty-two in all. Missouri—Four major-generals and twelve brigadier-generals— sixteen in all. Tennessee—Two lieutenant-generals, eight major-generals, and thirty-four brigadier-generals-forty-four in all. Kentucky—One lieutenant-general, five major-generals, and sixteen brigadier-generals-twenty-two in all. Maryland—Three major-generals and six brigadiergenerals-nine in all. Chas. Edgeworth Jones. Augusta, Ga. The spirit of ‘76 and the spirit of ‘61. Mr. R. A. Brock, Secretary of the Southern Historical Society, Richmond, Va.: dear sir,—The following incident was related to me last week by the Rev. William M. Dame, of Baltimore, who entered the service of the Confederacy at sixteen and served gallantly throughout the war in the Richmond Howitzers. With his permission I h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Longstreet-Gettysburg controversy [from the Richmond (Va.) Dispatch, February 16, 1896.] (search)
to capture those cities, he would have marched east, and not north to Chambersburg. General Lee never committed any such military blunder. The spy, therefore, only told General Lee what he knew before. On the morning of June 28th, at Frederick, Hooker was superseded by Meade. His army remained there that day. Instead of threatening General Lee's communications, as Colonel Marshall says, Meade withdrew the two corps that were holding the mountain passes when General Lee passed through Maryland, and moved his army the next day to the east so as to cover Washington and Baltimore. There was never any interruption of Lee's communications. 5. Colonel Marshall says that General Lee took his army to Gettysburg simply to keep Meade east of the mountain and prevent a threatened movement against his communications. This statement is contradicted by the record. General Lee attached no such importance to his communications—if he had any. The road was open to the Potomac, but it was not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
e, was acknowledged by Great Britain in 1783; that Maryland fought through that whole war until 1781 as an indeton Mosby. These ladies were all in full dress. Maryland room. This room was very artistic in its decora of the Army and Navy of the Confederate States of Maryland. The bust was undertaken about the time of the baadies have had assurances from the Confederates of Maryland, upon whom they rely, for gifts which will speedilryland; Mrs. E. T. D. Myers, Jr., nee Grace Adams, Maryland; Mrs. Waller Morton, nee McIntosh, Maryland; Mrs. Maryland; Mrs. Alfred Gray, Mrs. B. Saunders Johnson, Maryland; Mrs. John Goode, nee Lelia Symington; Mrs. Bradley T. JohnsonMaryland; Mrs. John Goode, nee Lelia Symington; Mrs. Bradley T. Johnson, Maryland; Mrs. Thomas Symington, nee Maude Randolph; Mrs. John K. Jones, nee Wilkinson, of Annapolis; Mrs. Maryland; Mrs. Thomas Symington, nee Maude Randolph; Mrs. John K. Jones, nee Wilkinson, of Annapolis; Mrs. Innes Randolph, and Mrs. James Pleasants. Tennessee and Florida rooms. The rooms representing these Statby the Confederate Society of the Army and Navy of Maryland, arrived, and was placed in position. Mrs. Bel
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