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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 31 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 17 1 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 13 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Corse or search for Corse in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
each time they advanced, they recoiled before the well directed musketry fire that greeted them. In one of these charges about a dozen of their men dashed around Corse's Brigade on our left, and came charging down in the rear of our line, shooting and yelling like demons. It was their last charge. All of them were killed, one bry that morning. If I am not mistaken, Steuart's Brigade moved out at the same time from the left of our division, but we could not see for the woods. Hunton and Corse forming the centre of our line, still held the road. It was expected that they would follow us at the right time. As we were marching we had woods to our right auick step, but in good order. Presently we heard firing and cheering in our rear, and looking back, we saw the Federal cavalry charging down in rear of Hunton and Corse and cutting off their retreat. Our situation was extremely critical. A large body of victorious cavalry was but a short distance behind us, and would soon be aft
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General George E. Pickett. (search)
n, on through flame and smoke, till the heights were taken; the battle won, and then, alas! Pickett's men, hemmed in on all sides and for want of support, had to fight their way back through equal danger over the blood-conquered ground, over the mangled, mutilated bodies of their dead and wounded comrades, while the army, as all the world knows, though ordered to come to Pickett's support, calmly looked on at the terrible massacre. If Pickett had had the other two brigades of his division (Corse and Jenkins), but of this more anon. Lincoln afterwards, in his dedication address on this sacred field, said: Here this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. The glory of Pickett's charge at Gettysburg (where, out of 4,500 brave Virginians, 3,393 were killed and wounded), will shine, in spite of Gordon's jealousy, with ever-increasing lustre as time rolls on, and the purity o