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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 1,039 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 833 7 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 656 14 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 580 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 459 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 435 13 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 355 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 352 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 333 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jefferson Davis or search for Jefferson Davis in all documents.

Your search returned 93 results in 16 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
le them to attain the degree of Bachelor of Arts. In accord with these instructions, Gov. Swain addressed the following letter to President Davis: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C., October 15, 1863. To his Excellency, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States. Sir—The accompaning resolutions, adopted by the trustees of this institution at their regular meeting in Raleigh, on the eighth instant, make it my duty to open a correspondence with you on the subjecr in the movement that looked toward peace with the United States, but the legal power of ending the war had been put by the Confederate Constitution into the hands of the President. Governor Graham was not among the confidential friends of President Davis, but worked through others, and had in this way a hand in setting on foot the Hampton Roads Conference. He was not a member of this Conference, but was President pro tem. of the Confederate Senate during the absence of Mr. Hunter on that mi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
But if the assassin of the President is not to escape deserved punishment, what shall be done to those who have attempted the assassination of the Republic—who have compassed the life of the nation? The lesson must be taught beyond the possibility of ever being unlearned, that treason is a crime—the greatest of human crimes. Expressions from high authority, of which these are samples, seemed to foreshadow unrelenting and vindictive persecution, to what limit none could surmise. Jefferson Davis was a prisoner in Fortress Monroe, ignominiously ironed like a common felon; John H. Reagan, late Confederate postmaster-general, was likewise confined in Fort Warren. Other late officials had escaped by flight in disguise and found safety in foreign lands. What future was reserved for the South, prostrate and helpless, wholly subject to the will of the victorious North, appeared to be beyond the scope of prophetic vision. A scattering of officers and soldiers. Many Texas office
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Autobiography of Gen. Patton Anderson, C. S. A. (search)
d States, and the country much excited on the topic then being discussed. Jefferson Davis and H. S. Foote were then the United States Senators from Mississippi. I took the same view of the question with Davis and Quitman—voted for a resolution in the House of Representatives of Mississippi requesting Senator Foote to resign hi in many portions of the State was even bitter. It has passed into history. Mr. Davis was defeated for governor by General Foote. The whole Democratic party was ls well as could be hoped; health still bad from fever and ague. In 1853 Jefferson Davis was tendered the position of Secretary of War in Mr. Pierce's Cabinet. Inised me to remove from Mississippi to a colder and dryer climate. I accepted Mr. Davis's proposal and repaired to Washington city, where I arrived on the night of tand Butler had gone in 1850. Through his instrumentality and the kindness of Mr. Davis (now Secretary of War) I was appointed United States marshal for the Territor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
s and the unquestionable ability and admitted excellence of each of these great soldiers. Had General Lee lived he would unhesitatingly have accepted his fair share of responsibility for the lack of final success at Gettysburg; but his readiness to assume all blame for failure, even though his lieutenants had failed to do what he had a right to expect of them in the way of co-operation, is in striking contrast to the statement of General Longstreet, as set forth by the Telegraph, that President Davis, Mr. Seddon, and nearly every officer of rank serving under Lee, were opposed to invading the enemy's country, especially after the failure of the Sharpsburg campaign.(?) * * * Yet not a voice was raised against this fatal march, except by General Longstreet when he rejoined General Lee after the battle of Chancellorsville. The two were alone together and what passed between them is now made known for the first time. This is indeed a revelation to those of us who were near General Lee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
orning of July 1st, Heth's Division fell into line, and debouched into the pike, marching towards Gettysburg in the following order, viz: Archer's Brigade of Tennesseans leading; next, Colonel John W. Brockenbrough's Brigade of Virginians; next, Davis' Mississippi Brigade: Fourth, Pettigrew's North Carolina Brigade. Archer's and Brockenbrough's Brigades each numbered 1,000 men, as many men were left on the road in the rapid march of A. P. Hill's Corps to overtake Longstreet, and pass him in C the line being formed by Brockenbrough's Virginians, and rallied behind them. Brockenbrough, also in marching order, ordered left-face, load; then, unable to fire because of the flying Tennesseans, he back-stepped the brigade until in line with Davis' Brigade, then forming battle line on the left or north side of the Cashtown pike. Buford's Cavalry withdrew with some six or seven hundred prisoners behind the wooded crest. General Heth now brought up Pettigrew's Brigade, and advanced the who
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
.; Crandol, T. J.; Cooper, Charles H., killed at Williamsburg, May 5, 1862; Cooper, James, dead; Davis, Robert A.; Davis, Louis F., died of wounds; Elliott, H. H., dead; Elliott, Robert E., dead; EthDavis, Louis F., died of wounds; Elliott, H. H., dead; Elliott, Robert E., dead; Ethridge, Leonidas; Edders, W. B.; Fitchett, William; Garrett, George, dead; Hawkins, Richard, dead; Hudgins, R. S.; Herbert, Thomas T., dead; Ham, Jacob C. died of wounds received May 21, 1864; Hudginsounded near Bernsboro, Md., 1863.; Dauougherty, W. T., captured at Front Royal, August 16, 1864; Davis, Barlow; Davis, Eddie, dead; Davis, P. P., captured October 12, 1864; Downey, J. W., dead; DrewrDavis, Eddie, dead; Davis, P. P., captured October 12, 1864; Downey, J. W., dead; Drewry, R. W., captured at Front Royal, August 16, 1864; Gammel, Nat., promoted to lieutenant; Hudgins B. F., dead; Hall, John, dead; Height, Wiley, killed at Haw's Shop, May 28, 1864; Jones, B. F., woundDavis, P. P., captured October 12, 1864; Downey, J. W., dead; Drewry, R. W., captured at Front Royal, August 16, 1864; Gammel, Nat., promoted to lieutenant; Hudgins B. F., dead; Hall, John, dead; Height, Wiley, killed at Haw's Shop, May 28, 1864; Jones, B. F., wounded at Trevillian, July 12, 1864; Laws, William, killed at Tood's Tavern, May 6, 1864; Marrow, D. G.; Mears, Levin, died in Richmond in 1863; Moreland, Alphonzo, dead; Murry, John, died in 1864; Phill
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
Petition for Mr. Davis' release. [from the Richmond times, July 12, 1896.] To the Editor of the Times. Sir,—Every incident connected with President Davis is of great interest. I accidenPresident Davis is of great interest. I accidentally found this item a few days ago: The ladies of Petersburg petition for the pardon of Jefferson Davis. The following petition, signed by over six hundred ladies of Petersburg, has been fJefferson Davis. The following petition, signed by over six hundred ladies of Petersburg, has been forwarded to his Excellency, President Johnson, praying for the pardon of Jefferson Davis. This method of reaching the President, has been adopted in other States and cities, and the appeal for clemeJefferson Davis. This method of reaching the President, has been adopted in other States and cities, and the appeal for clemency in behalf of the great state prisoner, bids fair to become universal throughout the land over which he lately ruled. Will the President disregard the earnest prayers of so large a portion of theroach your Excellency requesting executive clemency for our beloved captive head, late President Jefferson Davis, who is bound to each one of our section of the land by the indissoluble ties of frie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
al Lee. The army had marched and fought incessantly for over a month. Its route was marked by stragglers, who for many reasons had been unable to keep up with their commands. After the army crossed into Maryland, orders were given to collect these men and hold them on the south side of the Potomac, as it would have been dangerous for them to attempt to rejoin their commands while the army was operating in Maryland. I was sent by General Lee from Frederick City to Virginia to meet President Davis and dissuade him from his purpose of joining the army. On my return to General Lee, whom I rejoined just before the battle of Sharpsburg, I found the provost guard at Winchester with orders to halt and collect at that point all men who were attempting to rejoin their commands. The men returning from furlough, the stragglers from Cedar Run, Second Manassas, Chantilly, and Harper's Ferry, and those left on the march before the army crossed into Maryland, as well as in the hurried moveme
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
f the lost cause. His incomparable gifts and one Misfortune-were Mr. Davis and General Bragg responsible for his Fatalities? A recentthe hero of it, may have, unintentionally, done injustice to Hon. Jefferson Davis, as President of the Southern Confederacy, and General Braxtot fear truth as well as commendation. The charge made against Mr. Davis substantially is that he did not thoroughly appreciate General Wmuch, no doubt, could be said on both sides, but it may be due to Mr. Davis' memory, without injustice to the memory of Whiting, to state somI have reason to believe well-founded. His removal. Whether Mr. Davis removed General Whiting from the field of active operations for wg him command at Wilmington, N. C. We may charitably suppose that Mr. Davis intended no harm to General Whiting, for Wilmington was one of thf General Whiting, I have striven to be just to him as well as to Mr. Davis and General Bragg. The one fault of Whiting was so magnificently
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.51 (search)
o proceed to Beaver Dam, on the Central Railroad; arriving there, the column was to be divided, a part under General Kilpatrick was to move on Richmond along the north bank of James river, while the remainder under Colonel Dahlgreen were to cross to the south side, move down the right bank of the James, release the prisoners on Belle Isle, opposite Richmond; recross the river, burning the bridges after them, and rejoin Kilpatrick in the city. Richmond was to be given to the flames and President Davis and his cabinet killed. Up to this point in the transaction both historians are accurate enough—but let us see farther. McCabe says: Kilpatrick approached the city by the Brook turnpike, and there, with scarcely a show of fighting, turned off and kept down the peninsula; and Pollard says: Kilpatrick moved down on the Brook turnpike on the 1st of March, near the outline of the Richmond fortifications and without once getting in range of the artillery, took up a line of march down the
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