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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 184 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 88 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 81 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 80 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 68 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 62 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 56 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) or search for Appomattox (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 17 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
5. By Stephen Beauregard weeks, Ph. D. I. General introduction. First at Bethel; last at Appomattox. Such is the laconic inscription on the new monument to the Confederate dead which was recentof the same; fought bravely through the war; was wounded at Bristow Station and surrendered at Appomattox. There were for the year 1860-61 five tutors in the University. All of them volunteered. Fomni of this Institution who poured out their blood on the battle-fields from First Manassas to Appomattox. I shall now give a few statistics of the alumni. Were our University records more completee's surrender, but before the news had reached his cavalry commander. From First Manassas to Appomattox, the University saw the life blood of her alumni poured out in lavish profusion. From Gettysbmany troops as any other State, and yet surrendered twice as many troops as any other State at Appomattox. Prominent always among these troops of North Carolina were the alumni of this University. I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lieut.-Colonel Francis W. Smith, C. S. A. (search)
hose darkest days it did not reach him. On the retreat from Richmond the rear of the Confederate line was harried by sharpshooters and continued skirmishing. The place of danger was in the rear, and there, on the evening of April 5th, he was mortally wounded, three of his men falling at the same time. He was taken in an ambulance to Amelia Courthouse, where he was left by our retreating forces, with those who were wounded beside him, without the aid and comforts which might have spared him to life and usefulness. He died at noon April 6th. Thus, at the early age of twenty-six, a life beautiful and noble was ended in a soldier's grave, in a lost cause, though a cause that was not all in vain. Dum spiro spero. Better had it then been said, Dum exspiro spero—true alike of the vivid life which was passing out of sight, and the cause which three days later at Appomattox received its burial, to unfold anew after God's inscrutable plan—not ours. Anna M. D. Smith, White Marsh,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
was not wholly abandoned while the fate of Johnston's army and the other forces across the Mississippi was unknown. The idea of continuing the war in this State was prevalent, and by many believed practicable, and strongly advocated during the few weeks which preceded the final dissolution of the Confederate forces in Texas. General E. Kirby Smith, commanding the department, issued an address from Shreveport, La., to the soldiers, on April 22d, saying in reference to Lee's surrender at Appomattox: His army was but a small portion of our forces in Virginia. The armies of Johnston and Beauregard, tripling that under General Lee, are still in the field presenting an unterrified front to the enemy. On the same day, nearly three hundred miles away, the officers, from colonels to lieutenants, in the regiments known as Pyron's, Elmore's, De Bray's, Cook's Heavy Artillery, the Second Texas Cavalry, and others, signed a stirring appeal to the troops, which by a coincidence embodied the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
Lee and Longstreet. [from the Richmond times, June 14, 1896.] Editor of the Times: Sir,—I have read the review of General Longstreet's book, From Manassas to Appomattox, by the London Daily Telegraph, with much interest. We naturally feel anxious about the conclusions of the impartial and unbiased foreign student of history concerning the events of the war between the States, and especially as to his estimate of the leaders on the Southern side. This review, however, apppears to me to have been suggested by some one nearer home; and, as I read between the lines, I fancy that I hear the partisan here prompting the reviewer over there. Who on the other side of the Atlantic could claim to be so well informed of public sentiment in Virginia during the eventful years of 1862 and 1863 as to be able to assert that controversy raged high in Richmond between the followers of Lee and Johnston as to their relative merit, which is a great exaggeration, or to say that Longstreet wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
Battle of Sailor's Creek. [from the Richmond Dispatch, March 29, 1896.] Recollections of one who participated in it. A part taken by Hunter's Brigade. A charge that was an inspiring sight. No fear of the Cavalry. To the Editor of the Dispatch: Responding to your call of the 15th instant, I will give my own recollections of the battle of Sailor's Creek, which was fought on the 6th of April, 1865, just three days before the surrender at Appomattox. I was at that time captain of Company F, 8th Virginia Infantry, Hunton's Brigade, Pickett's Division. In this account I shall speak of this division in general, and of Hunton's Brigade in particular. It should be borne in mind that our brigade was not involved in the disaster that befell the rest of our division at Five Forks on the 1st day of April. We had been left behind when Pickett was ordered to support Fitz. Lee at Five Forks, and were engaged in the battle of Gravely Run on the 31st of March, fighting Warren's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Company I, 61st Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, C. S. A. (search)
1865, Battle of Hatcher's Run. Strength of company, 35; present, 14; absent, sick, 6; captured, 10; detail, 3; on leave, 2. The fight between Petersburg and Appomattox. Roster of Company I, 61st Regiment of Virginia Voluteers. the names of deserters are omitted. Captain Charles R. McAlpine, promoted major, wounded. W. Murdaugh, promoted Captain, October 27th, 1864, wounded May 3, 1863, at Salem Church, (Chancellorsville.) First Sergeant Johm M. Sherwood, surrendered at Appomattox. Second Sergeant Edward C. Shepherd, disabled, detailed for hospital duty. Third Sergeant David W. Thornton, detailed to work in Government shops. Co May 3, 1863, Chacellorsville, captured August 19, 1864, and not exchanged. Musician Joseph J. Smith, drummer. Privates. Beaton, Joseph, surrendered at Appomattox. Bateman, Jonathan. Barcroft, George W., left in hospital in Norfolk, sick, May 10, 1862, and never heard from. Butt, William T., mortally wounded May
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company D, Clarke Cavalry. (search)
of its officers and its members, their names, and the battles in which they participated. As I look back now through the vista of years, from Harper's Ferry to Appomattox, and from Appomattox to 1896, I see more clearly the glories in the lustre of their deeds, feel more satisfied than ever of the righteousness of our cause, and Appomattox to 1896, I see more clearly the glories in the lustre of their deeds, feel more satisfied than ever of the righteousness of our cause, and wonder how it was possible that we should have failed. It was a beautiful day that Company D set out to go to Harper's Ferry and save the arsenal there. The trees had put on their loveliest robes, the fields were clothed in the choicest verdure and the Blue Ridge smiled majestically, while the sparkling Shenandoah reflected thisinchester the second, Cedar Creek, Millford, Luray, Newtown, Back Road, New Creek, Lacey Spring, Beverley (in West Virginia), Five Forks, and from Petersburg to Appomattox. In the march around McClellan, Company D went with the 1st Regiment, and was the only one from the 6th Regiment that participated, and that happened by permi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.41 (search)
hen the result was announced it astonished Europe, and convicted the Confederate authorities of a failure in statesmanship. Bids amounting to more than $400,000,000 were made. It is idle now to speculate as to what effect on the prosecution of the war the investment of so large a sum of money by the people of France in the fortunes of the Confederacy would have had; but it is entirely possible that the Emperor Napoleon III would have been obliged to recognize the political authority of the Southern States when his countrymen evinced in a way so remarkable their supreme confidence in the ability of the Confederacy to obtain their independence. Recognized by one of the great Powers of Europe, and $400,000,000 of gold on hand for the purchase of ships and other military supplies in the spring of 1863, the strategy of the Gettysburg campaign might not have been required, and the thousands of valuable lives sacrificed from that time on to Appomattox might have been saved to the South.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
post, and constituted a part of this battalion until they were ordered to report at Wilmington to Major-General Whiting. Captain DeRosset left Fayetteville with 118 rank and file. On reaching the city of Wilmington, Company G of this battalion was thrown with Company B, as a battalion, with Captain DeRosset in command. Captain DeRosset had been severely wounded twice in the battles in Virginia, and was again wounded at Averasboro, N. C., in 1865, a few days days before the surrender at Appomattox. Company C-10 men, rank and file. Captain—George W. Decker. First Lieutenant—Charles R, Banks. Second Lieutenant—Charles E. Roberts. Third Lieutenant—Alonzo Garrison. Company D—73 men, rank and file. Captain—William P. Wemyes. First Lieutenant—James F. Woodward. Second Lieutenant—Samuel J. Walton. Third Lieutenant—Malcolm McInnis. Company E—61 men, rank and file. Captain—Martin VanBuren Talley. First Lieutenant—Robert F. Epps. Se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
—-- 95 Of the enlisted men of 1861-‘62, who went through the war, only five escaped unhurt, and two of these were detailed men. At the battle of Gaines' Mill and Frazier's Farm the company had thirty-nine out of forty-five killed and wounded. At the battle of Gettysburg, out of thirty-six, rank and file, eleven were killed and nineteen wounded. At Sailor's Creek Captain Archer Campbell—the fourth and last commander of the company—was killed in the act of surrendering. At Appomattox one lieutenant and several of the men who escaped at Sailor's Creek were included in the surrender. Colonel R. E. Withers, the first commander of the 18th Regiment, said of this company: A company which never failed in the hour of trial, and was always to be depended on. Colonel H. A. Carrington, successor to Colonel Withers, said of it: One of truest and most gallant companies which fought through the late war. Lieutenant-Colonel G. C. Cabell said: A noble band of Virginia brav
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