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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 8 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Africa (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.60 (search)
of further advance, ordered us to break off the pursuit, and we slowly returned to the Caledonia Iron Works. Having passed the buildings we were again fired upon from ambush. This section of Pennsylvania seems to be full of bushwhackers. At Greenwood we met our rear-guard, in charge of the captured horses, and required the citizens to feed men and animals. During the night we marched by way of Funkstown to Greencastle. Twice we came very close to strong cavalry detachments of the enemy, bwas repulsed with heavy loss. At 12 o'clock at night we met General Imboden's brigade, in charge of the wagon-train. The road was in a sorry condition, on account of the rain, and cut up by the wagons, some of which had to be left behind. At Greenwood and at Greencastle the train was attacked by Federal cavalry, but they were repulsed without being able to do much harm. All our men discussed our serious defeat at Gettysburg, its causes and probable consequences, and all seemed to agree that