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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 115 115 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 41 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 41 41 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 30 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 21 21 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 19 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 14 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 14 14 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for April 9th, 1865 AD or search for April 9th, 1865 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
I signed the paroles of more than 5,000 men besides those of my own brigade. It was this which gave rise to the ridiculous story lately published in the newspapers of the day and in Harper's Magazine. The correspondent, as usual, blundered upon enough of fact to make fiction murder truth, and make me ludicrous. It was the proudest moment of my life, and I am glad to explain its true history. Without intermission I was with that brigade in whole and in part from April, 1861, until April 9th, 1865, under the eye of General Lee from the first to the last scenes of the war, and we parted with each other on parole at Appomattox. Alas! how few were there at last of those who were comrades with us at first. There were less than 1,000 left of the 2,850 who returned from Charleston in April, 1864, Less than half were paroled of 2,400 who charged at Howlett's. Their last, after fighting in nineteen battles, was their most glorious charge; and they fired the last guns of the infantry at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
mbered by many a surviving Confederate veteran who received the benefit of their unstinted and kindly ministrations in time of dire distress. The committee, which was limited to about fifty members, was composed for the most part of citizens exempt from military duty. Afterward, as the exigency of the war period demanded, many of them went into active service, while others not only furnished substitutes, but continued their membership in the committee till the end came on that fatal 9th of April, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse. Nearly the first thing done when the committee organized was to form its members into a military company, to serve in case of emergency, of which John Dooley was chosen captain; Philip J. Wright, first lieutenant, and John J. Wilson, second lieutenant. The services of the committee extended through the battles of Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, the seven days fights around Richmond, including Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, Cold Har
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
rched through the city to the old Capitol prison under a double guard, to protect us from a threatened mob. After remaining in the old Capitol about two weeks we were taken to Johnson's Island, where I remained until June 18, 1865, when I was released, our cause being then a Lost Cause. Arrived in Richmond June 25th. Several years ago a friend of mine in St. Louis gave me a copy of the New York Herald, in which was a dispatch from one of its war correspondents, dated Farmville, Va., April 9, 1865. He spoke of the fight at Sailor's Creek as follows: Immense Slaughter of the Enemy.—The slaughter of the enemy in the fight of the 6th instant exceeded anything I ever saw. The ground over which they fought was literally strewn with their killed. The fighting was desperate, in many cases hand-to-hand. There were a number of bayonet wounds reported at the hospitals. He says nothing about the slaughter of his own men. We had an idea that we were doing some slaughtering ourselves.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
ique position of having probably the first and the last man killed on Virginia soil. Lieutenant Robert McChesney was the first, being bushwhacked in West Virginia, and James H. Wilson and Samuel B. Walker were, killed at Appomattox on the 9th of April, 1865, several hours after the terms of capitulation had been signed by Generals Lee and Grant. The following is a list of the dead and living who at any time during the war served in the company: William Adams, James Y. Anderson, John Y. Andeilled at Bratton's farm; Howard Houston, in battle, 1864; James Lockridge in battle in 1863; A. B. Mackey, at Moorefield, W. Va., in 1864; H. Rudd Morrison, in 1862; John F. Tribbett, at Monocacy in 1864; Samuel B. Walker and James H. Wilson, April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse; M. X. White, shot by Hunter's command near Lexington, while a prisoner, in 1864. Died During War—Samuel B. Anderson, Jacob H. Anderson, Robert Anderson, Charles B. Buchanan, Z. J. Colton, William B. Firebaugh, He