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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Raleigh Edward Colston or search for Raleigh Edward Colston in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
every officer and private to sustain. [Signed] A. P. Hill, Major-General. The regiment remained in camp until the 28th of April, 1863, when the command marched in the direction of Fredericksburg, and remained in camp below the city until the evening of May 1. On the morning of May 2 Jackson began to march upon Chancellorsville, and after a long and fatiguing journey the division was placed at right angles to the old turnpike road, Hill's Division being third in line, Rhodes' and Colston's being ahead of him. Hooker, having thrown up heavy works west, south and east, with the Chancellor house behind the center and with the dense thicket in front, was in a position almost impregnable. The flank movement was ordered about 6 o'clock in the afternoon. The Confederates rushed forward, cheering wildly, and in a few moments the enemy were completely demoralized and fled. On account of the thickets the lines had been mingled in confusion, and it was necessary to reform the lines
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
onored comrade Raleigh Edward Colston. General Colston was born of Virginia parentage in the cit his graduation and this last promotion, Professor Colston was a diligent and successful student, iia Military Institute, and knew him well, General Colston was assigned to the command of a brigade flank and rear, did not wait for an attack. Colston's division followed so rapidly, that it went finished the career of Stonewall Jackson. Colston was, on duty, possibly a little impetuous. After the death of Jackson, General Colston was ordered to report to General Beaureguard, and was at City Point and threatened Petersburg, General Colston was ordered to Petersburg, where he remaiof Northern Virginia. During that period General Colston kept the enemy at bay, and repelled severid he turned over the command to Major Prout, Colston was wholly paralyzed from his waist down, and addressed to his army, doubtless recurred to Colston's memory, and helped to sustain him in his di[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ode to the Confederate soldiers' monument in Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N. C. (search)
Ode to the Confederate soldiers' monument in Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, N. C. Dedicated to the Ladies' Memorial Association, of Wilmington, N. C. By General R. E. Colston. This Ode was delivered at the Anniversary Supper of the 3rd Regiment Association, on May 10, 1872, in reply to the second regular toast: Our dead. Erect upon a granite base He looks toward the glowing West; How stern and sad his noble face, How watchful!—thoa he stands at rest. He seems to scan with steadfast gaze The foeman's dark'ning line of blue; Does he perceive across the haze The glancing bay'nets flashing through? One hand with ev'ry clinched nerve Grips hard the gun o'er which he bends; The other hangs in graceful curve Which rounds the sinewy fingers' ends. Behold!—no carpet-knight is he, His manly grace is Nature's own; In ev'ry feature one may see The light that's caught from battle alone. His garments rough are old and worn, Hard used the shoes upon his feet, That belt and cartridg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
173. Cedar Run, Battle of, 98, 161. Centreville, Battle of, 100. Chambersburg, Battle of, 259. Chancellorsville, Disparity of Confederate and Federal forces at, 109, 169, 348. Chantilly, Battle of, 99. Christian Maj. E. J., killed, 159. Christie, Col. D. H., killed, 166. Clark, George, 84. Clayton, Capt., Robert, 139. Cleery, Major F. D 5. Cobb, Gen. T. R. R., Legion of, 147. Coinage Debate in 1852, 200. Cold Harbor, Battle of, 160, 171, 209, 234. Colston, Gen. R. E., Tribute to, 346; Ode by, 352. Confederate Cause, The, 21, 357. Confederate Dead, The, Poem by A. C. Gordon, 382. Confederate Forces, Total of, 308. Confederate Navy, The Shenandoah, 116; Alabama, Florida, 126. Council, Col J. C., 12. Cowardin, Lieut. John L., 139. Crater, Charge at the, 285. Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade; Operations of April, 1865, 38, 139, 285. Cumberland Grays, 21st Va. Infantry, Roster and Record of, 264. Custer, Gen., Geo. A., 239.