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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 999 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 382 26 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 379 15 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 288 22 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 283 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 243 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 233 43 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 210 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 200 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 186 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Longstreet or search for Longstreet in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
d where they stood unbroken for two days under the Paixhans and bombs of the enemy's batteries and ironclads, though regiments of infantry and batteries of artillery of General Junius Daniel's command stampeded through their ranks. After that, Colonel A. W. Starke riddled one of the enemy's side-wheel steamers from the heights of Deep Bottom. Again, in 1863, they were given the most difficult order to be executed which can be issued from headquarters. To make a divertisement in favor of Longstreet in his operations around Suffolk, in Nansemond, and to prevent the enemy from sending reinforcements from Yorktown against him, orders were issued to me from Richmond to move with all my available force as low down the peninsula as possible, and to do all the damage possible to the enemy and threaten him as closely as was in my power, without hazarding a battle unless certain of success. With 1,100 men, we moved to the six miles' ordinary in James City, ascertained that the enemy, 3,000 s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
ead of the column had reached the South Mountain. As our communications with the Potomac were menaced, it was resolved to prevent his further progress in that direction by cencentrating our army on the east side of the mountains. Accordingly, Longstreet and Hill were directed to proceed from Chambersburg to Gettysburg, to which point General Ewell was also instructed to march from Carlisle. The advance arrested. Again, in his later and more carefully considered report, after the reports of Hill, possibly to cross over the river and meet Meade on the line of the Susquehannah, a condition that appeared so alarming to Senator Cameron, or even to hasten to the capture of Philadelphia, trusting to his ability, with the two corps of Longstreet and Hill, to hold Meade's army in check in the mountain passes—an expectation that does not appear so unreasonable, since he, with but little more than two-thirds of his present army, at Chancellorsville, had defeated the Army of the Potomac, s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
this he marched his command to a field which gave him a good defensive position and the readiest means of junction with Longstreet. At that point, if he was compelled to retreat, he had the Aldie Gap behind him through which he could pass and rejoins having proposed to cross the river on the night of the 17th, is at fault. He says, at the interview he reports, that Longstreet came first and made his report. Longstreet says in his book that he was the last to come. General Lee's letter, aboveLongstreet says in his book that he was the last to come. General Lee's letter, above referred to, shows the entire concurrence between himself and General Jackson with respect to their movements both before and after the battle. That General Jackson should have advised Lee, without being asked, to cross the river the night of the 1cter. Lee and Jackson had to meet the present difficulty without the aid of a large portion of their army, absent with Longstreet. Lee and Jackson! How well I remember their meeting before this battle, and their confiding conference! How these tw
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
and 23d North Carolina, the 24th Virginia and the 2d Florida Battalion—was ordered back to aid Longstreet in resisting the furious attack. At the moment of our reaching the field the bloody drama wasHere many a brave boy met his fate without flinching. The right under Huger, the centre under Longstreet and D. H. Hill, and the left under G. W. Smith, were pressing steadily forward. A Northern wrperate and bloody efforts were made. According to the plan of attack, Generals D. H. Hill and Longstreet assailed the centre of the enemy's line of entrenchment; and it was at this point-notwithstands the first to become engaged. When the battle became general, and the whole of Jackson's and Longstreet's corps had come into action, a charge was ordered and the first line of works carried—then thae, of the 5th North Carolina, was in command of the brigade. The divisions of D. H. Hill and Longstreet bravely held the centre and right in this action. The 23d regiment here was able to muster bu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
ier's Farm) and witness the deathgrap-ple of Longstreet with McCall and Sumner. On Sunday mornings assistance. After dark, he was ordered to Longstreet; and, weary and footsore, these men marched len Dale and occupied the battlefield, where Longstreet and Hill had made their slendid fight unsuppposition and placed him in easy reach of General Longstreet's left. Longstreet, in his report, compLongstreet, in his report, complains of both Generals Jackson and Huger, saying that 50,000 were in easy hearing of the battle, yetere sat General Lee, President Davis and General Longstreet, killing two or three horses and woundinins, and after these, four other brigades of Longstreet's division, charged through the thick woods ng followed this road for nearly a mile, General Longstreet, whose troops were in reserve on the Lonthere in force we had better let him alone. Longstreet laughed and said: Don't get scared now that ce. In his official report of the battle, Longstreet said: A little after 3 P. M. I understood th[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
Manassas Gap railroad, Jackson's Division under Brigadier General Stark being on the right, Ewell's, under Lawton, in the centre, and A. P. Hill's on the left. The brigades of Thomas, Pender, Archer, and Gregg, were on the extreme left. After Longstreet arrived the enemy changed position and began to concentrate all its force opposite Hill's division. The attack was received with great steadiness, and the battle raged with great fury; the enemy was frequently repulsed, but on account of havinon Ewell, who repulsed them, but soon they returned, massing a heavy force against Hill. Heth's and Wilcox's divisions met every assault and successfully resisted them, but the enemy continued to make attacks until nightfall. Next morning, as Longstreet was relieving Hill, the enemy made an attack which at first created some confusion, but as soon as the troops recovered themselves, the enemy was driven back with spirit rarely surpassed. At night an attack was made against the enemy, and they
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
ible. General Hill left his camp near Petersburg on the night of the 24th, and marching south halted near Armstrong's Mill, about eight miles from Petersburg. On the morning of the 25th he advanced to Monk's Neck Bridge, three miles from Ream's station, and awaited advice from Hampton. The Confederate force actually present at Ream's station, consisted of Cooke's and MacRae's brigades of Heth's divisions, Lane's, Scales' and McGowan's brigades of Wilcox's division, Anderson's brigade of Longstreet's corps, two brigades of Mahone's division, Butler's and W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry, and a portion of Pegram's battalion of artillery. Being the central regiment of the brigade, MacRae's line of battle was formed on it, as was customary. Just previous to the assault upon General Hancock's command, the regiment was posted in the edge of a pine thicket, about 300 yards from the breastworks held by the Federal troops. When the order was given to advance, the men threw themselves