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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
d offered him battle, proves that Jackson knew his enemy's condition. At Fredericksburg, after Burnside's repulse, he asked me how many bandages I had. I told him, 100,000 Federal soldiers—60,000 in or near the great valley, and 40,000 at Fredericksburg—soundly thrashing in the field, from time to time, large portions of this g finding that Pope's divisions were widely separated—the left wing being at Fredericksburg, and the right under Siegel, at Sperryville, fifty miles from the left wing, Banks, at Culpeper, and then to descend like a thunderbolt on McDowell at Fredericksburg. On our route we lost an entire day because one of the division commanderssuch times he kept in view the counter-stroke. He did not wish to fight at Fredericksburg. His objection was, that there was no room for this return blow in the dayg of Almighty God. When General Gregg, of South Carolina, was wounded at Fredericksburg, an interesting incident occurred. General Jackson had had some misunderst<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
sick and wounded. After resting for a period of weeks along the banks of the Opequan, we find the regiment being moved by rapid marches to meet the enemy at Fredericksburg. The part it took at Fredericksburg was not very prominent. After the death of Garland, the brigade was commanded by General Alfred Iverson, a Georgian. AfFredericksburg was not very prominent. After the death of Garland, the brigade was commanded by General Alfred Iverson, a Georgian. After the battle of Sharpsburg, and while around Fredericksburg, General Rodes commanded the division. At Chancellorsville the regiment was on the extreme left, and was conspicuous in turning the enemy's right and accomplishing Hooker's defeat. Its loss was heavy at Chancellorsville. Its Major, C. C. Blacknall, was wounded here, Fredericksburg, General Rodes commanded the division. At Chancellorsville the regiment was on the extreme left, and was conspicuous in turning the enemy's right and accomplishing Hooker's defeat. Its loss was heavy at Chancellorsville. Its Major, C. C. Blacknall, was wounded here, and fell into the hands of the enemy, was confined in the old Capitol prison at Washington, at the time the Confederate spy, Miss Belle Boyd, was there; but was exchanged in time to return to the army before Gettysburg. The loss in the 23d at Chancellorsville was officially reported by General Rodes, as 173 killed, wounded and m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
ember, but which, owing to unavoidable causes, had to be postponed until the 20th of December. The address. Gentlemen—Some six years ago, in the town of Fredericksburg, I had the honor to preside over a meeting composed of influential citizens of this Commonwealth, when the initial steps were taken to organize an associationnging such other testimonials of respect for his eminent public character and services, as might be deemed appropriate. It is due to the Hon. J. B. Sener, of Fredericksburg, to state here, that he was, so far as I know, the first person to suggest such action; and he has, with others, steadily cherished and promoted the consummatconsisted of the following gentlemen: Hon. T. R. B. Wright, of Essex; St. George R. Fitzhugh, Judge J. B. Sener, Rufus B. Merchant and Hon. J. H. Kelly, of Fredericksburg; William F. Drinkard, Joseph Bryan, William Ryan, Rev. Dr. John B. Newton, General Archer Anderson, Colonel Frank G. Ruffin and Judge Waller R. Staples, of Ri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
t the enemy, who had crossed the Rappahannock at Hamilton's crossing, below Fredericksburg, but the enemy withdrew and no engagement ensued. This was the first time suffering was caused by the extreme cold rains. The command remained near Fredericksburg until May 25th, when it set out on a march, at sunset, in the direction of On December 13th, the army met three divisions of Burnside's army at Fredericksburg, Virginia. At this time, General Hill occupied the front line formed of two regment, with Pender's brigade, went into winter quarters at Camp Gregg, below Fredericksburg, and did picket duty near Moss Creek church. On December 27th, Colonel Wilntil the 28th of April, 1863, when the command marched in the direction of Fredericksburg, and remained in camp below the city until the evening of May 1. On the neral. On the morning of June 6, 1863, the brigade went into line below Fredericksburg, in front of the Bernard house, the enemy being in the Port Royal road and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
Staunton, 1861; William Lawhorn, at Staunton, 1862; S. S. Miller and Thomas P. McDowell, at Gordonsville, 1862; William Orenbaun, 1861; James P. Paxton, in prison, 1863; John Paxton, at Richmond, 1862; Cooke Sloan, at Staunton, 1861; James Steele, at Point Lookout, April, 1865; Benjamin Templeton, at Staunton, 1861; John White and Cyrus Withers, at Richmond, 1862; J. Womeldorf, 1861. Wounded and Recovered—Hugh S. Beard, Charlottesville, May 3, 1862; James P. Cash and William H. Cash, Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; William M. Crist, Petersburg, April 2, 1865, lost leg; H. W. Decker, 1862; James P. Ford, Petersburg, July 30, 1864; George J. Hamilton, Petersburg, April 2, 1865; Robert W. Johnston, Petersburg, 1864; Robert McNutt, Spotsylvania, May 1864; D. A. Ott, Strasburg, June I, 1862, lost arm; Thomas Paxton, Strasburg, June 1, 1862; Franklin Shewey, Bristoe Station, October 14, 1863; C. D. Vess, Cross Keys, June 8, 1862, lost leg; Albright Wallace, Alleghany Mountain, Decembe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
the battle, when General Johnston and other officers were congratulating him upon his fine conduct in the battle. These peculiarities have often been regarded and cited as evidences of the great genius he possessed. I have always heard it said that he was an advocate for raising the black flag, and showing no mercy to the enemy who were invading our country and destroying our homes. And it has often been said and written, that he urged General Lee to assault the enemy in the town of Fredericksburg by night, after their defeat, and while they were retreating over the river, and that General Lee refused to do so because of the peril to the people of the town. I have never heard of Jackson evincing any sympathy or gentleness, or merciful regard for the wounded enemies he must have seen, nor tender emotions of any sort. Therefore, the delightful book lately published by his widow is a revelation and surprise. Nothing in all literature can equal the exquisite gentleness and sweetn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Early, Capt. W. T., 135. Ennals, Bartholomew, 181. Ewell Gen. R. S., 40, 105. Ezekiel, H. T., 297. Farrar, Judge F. R., 364. Fayette Artillery, in the Movement on New Berne, N. C., 288. Federal Forces, Total of the, 303. Five Forks, Battle of, 16. Fitzhugh, Maj. P. H., killed, 14. Fleming, Robt. I., 355. Fleming, W. L, 45. Flowers, Col., Geo. W.. 245. Forrest, Gen. N. B.. Ability of, 45, 54. Frayser, Capt R. E.,369. Frazier's Farm, Battle of 98, 209, 211. Fredericksburg, Battle of, 96. Fugitive Slaves' Law, Author of, 190. Fulkerson, Col., Abram, 365. Gaines, E. W., 288. Gaines' Mill, Battle of, 97. Garland, Jr , Gen. Samuel, 157. Garrett. Col., killed, 171. Gettysburg Failure, Cause of the, 60. Georgia Battalion, Casualties in, April, 1865, Gibbs, Maj. W. H., 38. Gill, Sergeant-Maj W F., killed, 161. Gloucester County (Va.) Confederate dead of, I, 20. Goode, Col., J. Thomas, 3, 16. Gordon, A. C., 382. Gordon, Gen. John B