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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 335 89 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 300 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 283 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 274 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 238 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 194 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 175 173 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 124 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 121 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) or search for Chancellorsville (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
apture, it may be to turn back to the assistance of Hill, possibly to cross over the river and meet Meade on the line of the Susquehannah, a condition that appeared so alarming to Senator Cameron, or even to hasten to the capture of Philadelphia, trusting to his ability, with the two corps of Longstreet and Hill, to hold Meade's army in check in the mountain passes—an expectation that does not appear so unreasonable, since he, with but little more than two-thirds of his present army, at Chancellorsville, had defeated the Army of the Potomac, stronger in numbers and morale than at this time. General Meade could not possibly have moved upon the gap in rear of Cashtown before July 1st, and he states that he proposed to make that a day of rest and to bring up his supply there. On the 29th, Hill was at Fayetteville, on the road from Chambersburg to Cashtown, and in his report, writes (p. 606): I was directed to move on this road in the direction of York, and to cross the Susquehannah, men
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
in so short a time won so great a fame as Jackson. Two years, crowded with weighty deeds, now draw to a close, and Chancellorsville witnesses, perhaps, the most important single incident of his life as a soldier. The whole story has been too often, in command of what was called by the North, the finest army on the planet, crossed the Rappahannock and marched to Chancellorsville. He had 123,000 soldiers, Lee less than 58,000. Notwithstanding, Hooker was frightened at his own temerity in comifighting qualities of the Army of Northern Virginia equal to the task of ending the war. During the winter preceding Chancellorsville, in the course of a conversation at Moss Neck, he said: We must do more than defeat their armies; we must destroy tn him. When he arrived at the Plank Road he sent this, his last message, to Lee: The enemy has made a stand at Chancellorsville. I hope as soon as practicable to attack. I trust that an ever kind Providence will bless us with success. And
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
furnished substitutes, but continued their membership in the committee till the end came on that fatal 9th of April, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse. Nearly the first thing done when the committee organized was to form its members into a military company, to serve in case of emergency, of which John Dooley was chosen captain; Philip J. Wright, first lieutenant, and John J. Wilson, second lieutenant. The services of the committee extended through the battles of Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, the seven days fights around Richmond, including Seven Pines, Mechanicsville, Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill, Frayser's Farm, and, in fact, most of the engagements in which the Army of Northern Virginia participated. The committee served without pay, and was always ready to buy for the wounded, with their own funds, any delicacy that could not otherwise be procured for the use of the objects of their solicitude. But a few, comparatively, survive the lapse of years interven
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
and while around Fredericksburg, General Rodes commanded the division. At Chancellorsville the regiment was on the extreme left, and was conspicuous in turning the enemy's right and accomplishing Hooker's defeat. Its loss was heavy at Chancellorsville. Its Major, C. C. Blacknall, was wounded here, and fell into the hands of the in time to return to the army before Gettysburg. The loss in the 23d at Chancellorsville was officially reported by General Rodes, as 173 killed, wounded and missitles already referred to, which friends have furnished us, particularly of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg; but it is probably well to have left that to the more geneettysburg. It was somewhat now like it was when the fight first opened at Chancellorsville, barring the fact that the regiment did not number so many men. It entered the fight at Chancellorsville in first-rate trim, numbering somewhere between 300 and 400 men, rank and file. It lost good officers there in the death of Captains K
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
the city until the evening of May 1. On the morning of May 2 Jackson began to march upon Chancellorsville, and after a long and fatiguing journey the division was placed at right angles to the old in the road the whole brigade received a most destructive shelling from the batteries near Chancellorsville. Hill's Division was now in front, and was engaged in relieving those who had been in the und their colors. Jackson, accompanied by his staff and escort, rode down the road towards Chancellorsville. In the obscurity of the night they were mistaken for the enemy and fired upon, and Jacksol took command of Jackson's Corps, after recovering from his wound, Pender, also wounded at Chancellorsville, was promoted to major-general, and Colonel A. M. Scales, the senior colonel of the brigade, to brigadier-general. Scales being absent on account of a wound received at Chancellorsville, Colonel W. J. Hoke was placed in command of the brigade and continued in command until Scales rejoined
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cumberland Grays, Company D, Twenty-first Virginia Infantry. (search)
D., died in prison. Dowdy, James, killed at Cedar Mountain. Dowdy, Wilson M., while in the hospital at Winchester, in 1862, hearing that his company was in a heavy engagement, seized a musket, and running at a double-quick, fainted, fell, and in two days a little mound was raised to mark the spot where this gallant soldier sleeps. Dunford, John F., killed at Gettysburg. Edwards, Thomas, died in hospital. Flippen, Charles, killed at Kernstown. Flippen, J. T., wounded at Chancellorsville, and died since the war. Flippen, Allen, died in 1862. Flippen, William, died in 1861. Godsey, Daniel L., died since the war. Garnett, Robert K., killed at Gettysburg. Garnett, James S., lost a leg; since died. Hendrick, Merritt S., died in 1861. Hatcher, Joseph, died in 1862. Harris, Joseph N., died since the war. Jones, Levi, died since the war. King, George H., was the last man killed at Gettysburg in his company, a few yards from the enemy's line. Me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
leton, Benjamin Templeton, Job Thorn, R. R. Tribbett, F. M. Tribbett, Matthew Vess, C. D. Vess, Albright Wallace, Ed. Wallace, J. W. Wallace, George White, Robert White, I. M. White, John White, J. W. Whitesel, E. M. Wiseman, James A. Wine, John A. Wilson, S. W. Wilson, Joseph M. Wilson, J. Womeldorf, George Wood and Cyrus Withers. List of Casualties. Killed—J. H. McCown, Alleghany Mountain, December 12, 1861; W. P. Templeton and J. Ludwick, Cross Keys, June 8, 1862; Adolphus Sly, Chancellorsville, May 3, 1863; Preston Lawhorn and Robert Coffey, Bristoe Station, October 14, 1863; George Hoyleman, William J. Bartlett, and George White, Gettysburg, July 3, 1863; Cyrus Goolsby, Thomas N. McCormick, and John T. Ford, Petersburg, July 30, 1864; John L. Drayboud, James T. Paxton, Franklin Shaver, and Lieutenant Samuel Wallace, Petersburg, April 2, 1865. Dicdfrom Wounds—W. H. Paxton, wounded at Strasburg, June 1, 1862;——Houcher, wounded at Cross Keys, June 8, 1862; James P. Risk, wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Raleigh E. Colston, C. S. Army. (search)
re attack of fever and jaundice, from which he did not recover until the following December; when he reported for duty and was assigned to the command of a brigade of Southwestern Virginians, and was ordered to Petersburg. In April, 1863, by request of Stonewall Jackson, who had been for ten years his colleague in the faculty of the Virginia Military Institute, and knew him well, General Colston was assigned to the command of a brigade in Trimble's division, of Jackson's corps. At Chancellorsville, at 6 o'clock P. M., May 2, 1863, the hour when Stonewall Jackson ordered his corps of 26,000 men to disclose their presence in rear of the right flank of General Hooker's grand army, Jackson's command was formed, with Rodes' division in front, Trimble's division under Colston (Trimble being disabled), in the second line two yards in the rear, and A. P. Hill's division in supporting distance in column. At the word, the men burst with a cheer upon the startled enemy, and like a discipli
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
cknall, Maj. T. H., 168. Blake, Capt. T. B., 139, 286. Blow, Capt. W. N, 275 Boonsboro, Battle of, 162, 276 Boyd, Miss, Belle, 165. Boy Heroes at Cold Harbor, 234. Brandy Station, Battle of, 148, 168. Bristow Station, Battle of, 339. Bullock, C. S. N., Irvine S., 117. Burkittsville, Charge at, 148 Burgess' Mill, Battle of, 51, 343. Cedar Creek, Battle of, 173. Cedar Run, Battle of, 98, 161. Centreville, Battle of, 100. Chambersburg, Battle of, 259. Chancellorsville, Disparity of Confederate and Federal forces at, 109, 169, 348. Chantilly, Battle of, 99. Christian Maj. E. J., killed, 159. Christie, Col. D. H., killed, 166. Clark, George, 84. Clayton, Capt., Robert, 139. Cleery, Major F. D 5. Cobb, Gen. T. R. R., Legion of, 147. Coinage Debate in 1852, 200. Cold Harbor, Battle of, 160, 171, 209, 234. Colston, Gen. R. E., Tribute to, 346; Ode by, 352. Confederate Cause, The, 21, 357. Confederate Dead, The, Poem by A. C