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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 44 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 36 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 36 0 Browse Search
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison 36 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 34 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 28 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 28 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 22 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Christ or search for Christ in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Memorial. (search)
e so, nor more devoted to the Presbyterian polity, but he had nothing of the narrowness of a sectarian. His Christianity was broad enough to embrace all who love Christ. As a consequence, he was beloved and admired by all denominations, and members of other churches were constantly found among his congregations. His success as ed. He was an evangelical of evangelicals, and held unwaveringly to the time-honored doctrines of the Church. He espoused no novelties in theology, but preached Christ and Him crucified, revealed by infallible Scriptures, as the only hope of sinful men, and the sufficient Gospel, for a lost and ruined world. Few men have had miles on horseback that afternoon to hear him preach again. He was urged to remain and assist in the revival, and did so for several days, winning many souls to Christ by his persuasive eloquence and fervor. During the session of 1850-51, of the University of Virginia, Dr. Hoge was one of a number of prominent ministers, who,