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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The dismemberment of Virginia. (search)
s her leading statesmen showed a far-sighted wisdom, and a breadth of patriotism for which no words of praise can be too strong. In the making of the government under which we live, says the same writer, these five names—Washington, Madison, Hamilton, Jefferson and Marshall—stand before all others. Four out of the five, as it is hardly necessary to remind the reader, were Virginians. But why accumulate testimony? The warmest of partisans could not desire, could not select himself, strondge, of Massachusetts. When, says he, the Constitution was adopted by the votes of States at Philadelphia, and accepted by the votes of States in popular conventions, it is safe to say that there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton, on the one side, to George Clinton and George Mason, on the other, who regarded the new system as anything but an experiment entered upon by the States, and from which each and every State had the right peaceably to withdraw, a right which was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
the hostile fortress, scattered its deadly contents in all directions. Fort Moultrie then took up the tale of death, and in a moment the guns from the redoubtable gun battery on Cummings Point, from Captain (John) McCrady's Battery, from Captain James Hamilton's Floating Battery, the enfilade battery and other fortifications spit forth their wrath at the grim fortress, rising so defiantly out of the sea. Major Anderson received the shot and shell in silence, and some excited lookers on, ignod by the shock of the shot, and though that formidable structure had been struck eleven times, the balls had not started a single bolt. Anderson had concentrated his fire upon the Floating Battery and the Dahlgren Battery under command of Lieutenant Hamilton. The following cheering tidings were brought to the city by Colonel Edmund Yates, acting lieutenant to Dozier, of the Confederate States Navy, from Fort Johnson: Stevens's Battery and the Floating Battery are doing important service. S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
etween the opposing ideas, two years afterwards, was elected President of the United States, and then re-elected in 1804; and his successor was Madison, upon whose motion a proposed clause in the Constitution authorizing the exertion of the force of the whole against delinquent States, was unanimously postponed. Madison, who scouted any idea of any government for the United States, framed on the supposed practicability of using force against unconstitutional proceedings of a State. Even Hamilton had said, to coerce a State was one of the maddest projects that was ever devised. * * * But can we believe that a State will ever suffer itself to be used as an instrument of coercion? The thing is a dream. It is impossible. Massachusetts, not South Carolina, first stood sponsor for the right of secession. Nearly half a century before the convention at Charleston, another convention at Hartford had proclaimed secession as a rightful and desirable remedy against Federal grievances.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate cause and its defenders. (search)
are not all in vain. Though the Confederacy fell, as an actual physical power, she lives illustrated by them, eternally in her just cause—the cause of constitutional liberty. Mr. Henry Cabot Lodge, one of the present Senators from Massachusetts, in his life of Webster, says: When the Constitution was adopted by the votes of the States at Philadelphia, and accepted by the States in popular conventions, it is safe to say that there was not a man in the country, from Washington and Hamilton on the one side to George Clinton and George Mason on the other, who regarded the new system as anything but an experiment entered upon by the States, from which each and every State had the right peaceably to withdraw—a right which was very likely to be exercised. And I heard Mr. James C. Carter, of New York, but a native of New England, and one of the greatest lawyers in this country, in his address recently delivered at the University of Virginia, say: I may hazard the opinion
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Garnett, Hon. T. S., 315. Geneva Commission; Finding of the, 219. Germanna Ford, Battle of, 25. Gettysburg, Battle of, 12, 116; Causes of Defeat at, 127. Gilham, Col., Wm.. 242. Gladstone, Hon. W. E, 332. Glennan, M , 167. Gordon, Col. A. M.; killed, 7. Gorgas, Gen., Josiah, 366. Graves, Gen. B., 16. Greeley, Horace, 325, 329. Greg. Percy, 332. Grigsby, Hugh Blair, 351. Guthrie, Rev., Donald, 372. Hampden-Sidney College, 258, 289. Hamilton, Alex., 189. Hamilton, Capt., James, 105. Hammond, Lieu't., killed, Hanover C. H.; Engagement at, 249. Harper's Ferry, Va., 139 Hawes, Samuel P., 259. Hay, Mary Eliza, 33. Hayes, General; captured, 8. Henry, Win. Wirt, 350. Herbert, Hon. H. A.; address of, 215. Heyward, Caroline Thos., 33. Hill, Maj. James H., 158. Hoar, G. F.; on the Generosity of Va., 53. Hobart, Pasha, 161 Hobson, Lt. R. P., 219, 232. Hoge, Rev. Dr., M. D., 10, 243; A Memorial of, 255; Ancestry and Kindred, 257; Devotion to