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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.2 (search)
ed dentist of that day) and old Paul Michaux, of the First Company of Richmond Howitzers—they undertaking to conceal us on the train until it started and to secure our enrollment in the company when we arrived—both of which undertakings they most skilfully and faithfully performed. Fine gunner and fighter. I saw but little of Beers after this. Just when he joined the Army I cannot say, but I know that it must have been some time before the battles around Richmond in the early summer of 1862; for, on the battlefield of Malvern Hill, I met some of the men of the Letcher Artillery—Greenlee Davidson's company, to which he belonged—who told me that my Yankee was the finest gunner in the battery and fought like a Turk. Between Malvern Hill and Chancellorsville I saw Beers perhaps two or three times—I think once in Richmond, shortly after his wife and children and my mother and sisters arrived from the North. I have seldom seen a better looking soldier. He was about five feet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
in issue between the contending parties. The States of the Confederacy avowed the right to secede, and denied the power of the Federal Government to coerce them. Mr. Lincoln denied the first, and maintained the second. It was on this issue the two parties litigant submitted their controversy to the gage of battle. How, then, did the emancipation of the slaves become involved in the great war which followed? The facts are facts of history, and can be quickly declared. Proclamation of 1862. On the 22d of September, 1862, after the war had been in progress for a year and a half, Mr. Lincoln issued his proclamation, in which he declared that the slaves held in the States, or portions of States which should be still in rebellion on the 1st of January, 1863, following, would be, by a subsequent proclamation, emancipated. His justification was found in the fact that, as a war measure, it would deplete the strength of the Confederacy and augment the forces of the Union. In all
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover county heroes. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, October 15, 1899.] (search)
. Corporal Thomas L. Jones, Second Manassas, 1862. Samuel Baker, Richmond, 1862. N. A. Cross,1862. N. A. Cross, Richmond, 1862. W. T. Ford, Richmond, 1862. Martin Baker, Richmond, 1862. William J. Chapmd, 1863. William Patterson, Second Manassas, 1862. John Barker, Second Manassas, 1862. And1862. Andrew Smith, Malvern Hill, 1862. Silas Thacker, Sharpsburg, 1862. John Wiltshire, Sharpsburg, 181862. Nelson's battery. Major Franklin Terrell. Edmund Anderson, Second Cold Harbor, 1864. BSharpsburg, 1862. Samuel Harris, Sharpsburg, 1862. A. J. Harris, Richmond, 1862. Stephen C.harpsburg, 1862. William Wicker, Sharpsburg, 1862. Williamson Talley. Cornelius Batkins. 4. Edward Talley. J. C. Butler, Sharpsburg, 1862. W. D. Winston, Sharpsburg, 1862. Walter 1862. Walter Hall, Seven Pines, 1862. John Eddleton, Suffolk, 1863. Martin Lambert, Suffolk, 1863. Charl1862. John Eddleton, Suffolk, 1863. Martin Lambert, Suffolk, 1863. Charles Terrell, Company E, Fifteenth Virginia; Drewry's Bluff, 1864. George L. Terrell, Company E, Fi[9 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
rnest solicitation of many of our readers: Commander and Comrades. I thank you for the invitation to speak to you this evening, and respond to it cheerfully, but with some misgiving, lest I should fail to give honor where honor is due, and because the subject is so personal to me. A boat expedition is somewhat out of the ordinary events, and to make it understood by all, I will have to go into particulars at the risk of being tedious. After the fall of Roanoke Island in the winter of 1862, the Federals had control of the sounds of North Carolina, and of some of the rivers emptying into them. They had occupied all the towns situated on the water, and among them New Bern, which lies at the confluence of the Neuse and Trent rivers, occupying an angle between the two—a place easily defended by the power having control of the water. They had built strong earthworks on the land side, stretching from river to river, and had several gunboats cruising about to protect the place on t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
legs of the wounded; other wounded could not be attended to properly. On the evening of the 29th I was moved to the hospital in Manchester and placed in the roundhouse of the Danville railroad. I remained there until the last week in August, when I was given a furlough for thirty days. I came home and remained there for two years before I was able to rejoin my command. I have written this from memory. I kept no record at the time. May be in error along some lines. The recollections of the days long past are often called up in memory—days that are never to be forgotten by those engaged in the conflict and those at home watching and waiting to hear from the front. Members of Company G, Orr's Rifles, who died with disease, summer, 1862: W. D. Anderson, R. S. Ashley, T. J. Beacham, S. N. Bowen, W. T. Ellis, Robert M. Ellis, C. N. Graham, J. B. Graham, J. Moon Jones, T. G. Law, J. R. McAdams, J. T. Mc-Whorter, F. M. McKee, S. L. Pratt, W. N. Shirley, Moses Smith, J. R. Swance
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
igned as a representative regiment of his State, for service in Virginia. It was organized at Pulatka, early in May, with John W. Starke as captain, C. Seton Fleming, first lieutenant, Alexander Mosely (son of ex-Governor Mosely), senior second lieutenant and John E. Caine, a native of South Carolina, as junior second lieutenant. The Second Florida infantry entered the field by going into encampment at Yorktown, Va., on the 17th September, 1861. In the sight of Yorktown, in the spring of 1862, the Second Florida, received its baptism of fire in a sortie in conjunction with the Second Mississippi battalion, made to dislodge a detachment of the enemy's sharpshooters near Fort Magruder; and in which they were successful. As acting-adjutant of the Second Florida, in the engagement at Williamsburg, May, 1862, Lieutenant Fleming was severely wounded through the hip and was left in Williamsburg. Upon the entrance of the enemy he fell into their hands, and in the latter part of Jul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
further wholesale devastations and new rivers of human blood; and there is a widespread conviction that the Government and its supporters are not anxious for peace, and do not improve proffered opportunities to achieve it. He further intimates (page 482) the possibility of a Northern insurrection. Ben Perley Poore, in Reminiscences of Lincoln, collected and edited by Allen Thorndyke Rice (page 248), shows Beecher's censures of Lincoln, and so do Beecher's editorials in the Independent of 1862. Hapgood's Abraham Lincoln quotes (page 164) Wendell Phillips about Lincoln, Who is this huckster in politics? Who is this county court lawyer? Morse's Lincoln (Vol. I, page 177) gives severe censures of Lincoln by Wendell Phillips. McClure's Lincoln, etc., records in two places (pages 112 and 259) the reprobation of Lincoln by Thad. Stevens, The Great Commoner. Miss Ida Tarbell, in McClure's Magazine for 1899 (page 277), calls Sumner, Wade, Winter Davis and Chase malicious foes of Linc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
further wholesale devastations and new rivers of human blood; and there is a widespread conviction that the Government and its supporters are not anxious for peace, and do not improve proffered opportunities to achieve it. He further intimates (page 482) the possibility of a Northern insurrection. Ben Perley Poore, in Reminiscences of Lincoln, collected and edited by Allen Thorndyke Rice (page 248), shows Beecher's censures of Lincoln, and so do Beecher's editorials in the Independent of 1862. Hapgood's Abraham Lincoln quotes (page 164) Wendell Phillips about Lincoln, Who is this huckster in politics? Who is this county court lawyer? Morse's Lincoln (Vol. I, page 177) gives severe censures of Lincoln by Wendell Phillips. McClure's Lincoln, etc., records in two places (pages 112 and 259) the reprobation of Lincoln by Thad. Stevens, The Great Commoner. Miss Ida Tarbell, in McClure's Magazine for 1899 (page 277), calls Sumner, Wade, Winter Davis and Chase malicious foes of Linc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.55 (search)
, at Gettysburg. Died during the War—James Gold, in 1861; John Armentrout, in 1862; Philander Mackey; Nash Turpin, in hospital at Richmond in 1862; Samuel Goul andhmond in 1862; Samuel Goul and John Goul, near Louisa Courthouse in 1862; Zebulon Rader, in 1862; John Hill, in 1862; William James Wash, at Charlottesville in 1862. hmond in 1862; Samuel Goul and John Goul, near Louisa Courthouse in 1862; Zebulon Rader, in 1862; John Hill, in 1862; William James Wash, at Charlottesville in 1862. hmond in 1862; Samuel Goul and John Goul, near Louisa Courthouse in 1862; Zebulon Rader, in 1862; John Hill, in 1862; William James Wash, at Charlottesville in 1862. hmond in 1862; Samuel Goul and John Goul, near Louisa Courthouse in 1862; Zebulon Rader, in 1862; John Hill, in 1862; William James Wash, at Charlottesville in 1862. hmond in 1862; Samuel Goul and John Goul, near Louisa Courthouse in 1862; Zebulon Rader, in 1862; John Hill, in 1862; William James Wash, at Charlottesville in 1862
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.56 (search)
es,—— Johnson, L. S. King, J. R. Little, R. S. Lewis, St. George T. Mason, A. M. Maclin, J. McGlemore, C. McCourt, A. Norris, John R. Norris,——Neblett, S, Potts, P. W. H. Parsons, W. H. Pennington, Roger A. Pryor, A. B. Parker, E. B. Robinson, J. W. Saunders, J. D. Spain, C. W. Spratley, W. W. Spratley, J. C. Smith, George Seaborn, W. E. Thornton, P. Vellines, Joseph H. Walters, J. L. Williamson. Killed. James McGlemore, Chickahominy river, June, 1862. Sidney Potts, died in hospital, 1862. William G. Freeman, Blackwater river, October, 1862. W. H. H. Parker, Middleburg, June, 1863. C. W. Spratley, Brandy Station, October, 1863. J. R. Morris, Upperville, June, 1863. Richard Parker, Upperville, June, 1863. J. Lewis Williamson, wounded Spotsylvania Courthouse, and died May, 1864. George Blow Walker, Ashland, June, 1864. J. L. Jordan, died in hospital, 1864. Richard Grigg, died at home, 1864. Thomas W. Adkins, Dinwiddie Courthouse, March, 1865. I.