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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Mercer Garnett or search for James Mercer Garnett in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Captain James M. Garnett, ordnance officer Rodes's division, 2d corps, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Diary of Captain James M. Garnett, ordnance officer Rodes's division, 2d corps, army of Northern Virginia. From August 5th to November 30th, 1864, covering part of General Early's campaign in the Shenandoah Valley. [The Editor has pleasure in preserving in the pages of the Southern Historical Society Papers the following interesting diary of a Confederate officer, and well-known educator, Professor James Mercer Garnett, Ll. D.] November 30th, 1864. Private Diary from August 5th tProfessor James Mercer Garnett, Ll. D.] November 30th, 1864. Private Diary from August 5th to November 30th, ‘64, covering time from last trip across Potomac to return of ordnance trains to camp near Staunton, about two miles out on Waynesboroa road. Troops still at New Market, but expect them back soon, and think we will go into winter-quarters between Staunton or Waynesboroa and Port Republic, unless Mars Robert wants us down at Richmond. Camp near Hainesville, Friday, August 5th, 1864. Moved from our camp near Winchester day before yesterday evening, and camped that night at B
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
iaferro Succeeds to command after the fall of Garnett—Incidents of the report by Dr. Henry M. Priceill (Elkins), nine miles beyond Beverley, General Garnett faced McClellan's 15,000 with 2,000 men, men of the Forty-fourth were held, under General Garnett's positive order, as idle witnesses almos drawn up in the streets of Beverley, waiting Garnett, our last march made amid a thunder-storm andwet to the skin, there came a last order from Garnett to take the prisoners from the jail and fall July reached Monterey and encamped, awaiting Garnett's forces to join us. Pegram, cut off by thisrrender the force with him to McClellan. General Garnett commenced to retreat on the night of the . Dr. Price says Colonel Scott was held under Garnett's positive order at the forks-of-the-road poidered Scott to join him at Laurel Hill. Then Garnett didn't know that David L. Hart, a mountaineered from what they were anticipated to be when Garnett wrote that order, and the order was no longer[19 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Hon. T. S. Garnett (search)
n the Presentation to the circuit Court of Essex county, Va. (Honorable T. R. B. Wright, presiding), of the portrait of the Honorable M. R. H. Garnett, at Tappahannock, Va., July 20, 1898. Muscoe Russell Hunter Garnett was the son of James Mercer Garnett, Jr., who was the son of James Mercer Garnett, of Elmwood, and Maria Hunter, sister of Honorable R. M. T. Hunter. His father was educated at Princeton College and devoted himself to the law, but died at too early an age to be remembered bJames Mercer Garnett, of Elmwood, and Maria Hunter, sister of Honorable R. M. T. Hunter. His father was educated at Princeton College and devoted himself to the law, but died at too early an age to be remembered by any but his immediate family, by whom he was esteemed as a man of great intellectual force. His son, Muscoe, was born July 25, 1821, and was educated at the Elmwood School, established there by his grandfather. He entered the University of Virginia at the opening of the session of 1838-39, and graduated that session in Latin, Greek, French, German and Mathematics. After a year's intermission he returned to the University to pursue the study of law, and graduated as Bachelor of Law at the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ordnance report of Grimes's division. (search)
d todayIn hands of men,722 4768920567610368125282222,590 In brigade ordnance wagons11119281123128,750 In division train,30141010211,000 ———————————————————————— Total on hand,76314772220571412470626282262,340 Respectfully submitted, James M. Garnett, Capt. and Ord. Off., Grimes' Div., 2d Corps, A. N. V. For Lt.-Col. B. G. Baldwin, Chf. Ord., A. N. V. Copy of ordnance report of Grimes's Division, Second Corps, A. N. V., made at Appomattox C. H., Va., April 10th, 1865, to the Chiefreat, but it should be remembered that the latter figure includes musicians, teamsters, and detailed men of all kinds in the commissary, quartermaster, medical and ordnance departments of the four brigades and the division. It is possible too that some stragglers may have come up in the meantime, although the ranks were kept pretty well closed up after the enemy got in our rear. However, 722 muskets represents the fighting strength of Grimes's division on April 9th, 1865
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Judge William Brockenbrough. (search)
ines, two Upshaws (Horace and Edwin), and Muscoe Garnett, came from the country; Phil. Branham and Chinn came across the Rappahannock; Richard Baylor from the upper part of the county, and John L. Marye and Carter L. Stevenson from Fredericksburg. Mr. Marye had lived in Tappahannock, where he served in the store of Mr. Robert Weir. Whilst I was at school in Fredericksburg, I became well acquainted with him and Mr. Stevenson, and intimate with their sons. My last Essex county teacher, James M. Garnett, was a member of its bar. Judge Brockenbrough married Judith White, daughter of John and Judith White. One of their sons, John White Brockenbrough, married Miss Mary C. Bowyer, and became distinguished as judge of the United States Court for the Western district of Virginia; as founder and head of his own law school at Lexington, and afterwards as Professor in the Law School of Washington and Lee University. He followed the example of his father by publishing a volume of Federal D