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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 278 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 202 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 140 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 115 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 102 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 79 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 53 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lafayette McLaws or search for Lafayette McLaws in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
bruary, 1879, in the form of an address by General Lafayette McLaws. He had delivered a similar address as early as 1873. McLaws was in command of the advance division of Longstreet's men as they approached Gettysburg. By Longstreet's order McLaws went into camp on the western side of Willoughby Run after 12 o'clock in the ni miles from Lee's headquarters, on Seminary Ridge. McLaws wrote these words: Some time after my arrival I rece place I afterward went to (the Peach Orchard). McLaws said further that if the corps had moved boldly in t unspoken. This came at last from the lips of General McLaws on April 27, 1896. He revised his former Gettyr, published in 1896, he asserts that the troops of McLaws and Hood reached Lee's headquarters at sunrise on t full view. The mythical spectators, the troops of McLaws and Hood, stained with mud of an alleged night marcyth vanishes in the light of the statements made by McLaws, Kershaw, and the rest. The alleged spectacle of L
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
that only three brigades became fully engaged— Wilcox's, Perry's and Wright's. Colonel Jayne's 48th Mississippi, of Perry's brigade, which had been thrown forward as skirmishers and lost heavily, supposing that the brigade proper would follow on in support; but for some reason it did not, nor did Mahone's on the left. While marching through a piece of woods to his proper place, on the 2d, Wilcox became engaged with the enemy, and soon repulsed him. About 6 P. M. (too late to co-operate with McLaws and Hood, though no blame can attach to the brigadiers), the several brigades in the division were ordered to advance to the attack, in the order given above. Wilcox moved forward promptly, followed by Lang, who, in his turn, was followed by Wright. Each fought bravely and desperately, drove the enemy back to its front, and ran over several batteries and heaps of slain; but each, in its turn, was compelled, after almost unparalleled losses, to abandon the enterprise of carrying the impregn
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
orts to defeat the second election of, 365; did not offer to pay for our slaves, 374. Longstreet, General, James, his delinquency at Gettysburg, 195. Lowell, General Charles R., 273. Loyall, Commander B. P., 136. McCabe, W. Gordon, 286. McCaslan, Captain W. E., killed, 196. McCausland, General, John, 179. McClure, Colonel A. K., 366. McGuire, Dr., Hunter, his able report on school histories, 98. McGuire, Prof. J. P. Address by, 352, 359 McDowell, Battle of, 43. McLaws, General L., 55. McCaw, Dr J. B., 335. McMasters, Lieutenant, killed, 316 Magruder: Colonel John Bowie, Sketch of, 205. Marshall, Colonel, Thomas, killed, 15. Marye's Heights, 225. Mason, Wiley Roy, 338 Massachusetts advocated secession, 65. Massie, Captain LIV., killed, 9 Matthews, James P.. 26 Mattison, J. W., 157. Mauk, Sergeant John H., 26. Maury, General D. H., Sketch of, 335; comrades at West Point, 336; in the Mexican war 337; last days in the U. S. army, 339; in til