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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 104 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 77 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 70 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 53 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 39 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 37 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 25 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Pegram or search for John Pegram in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Captain James M. Garnett, ordnance officer Rodes's division, 2d corps, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
bout 6 o'clock yesterday morning. Gregory and I spent the night in a carriage-house at General Early's Headquarters, and had to plunder a field of corn to get feed for our horses. The trains moved up the river about 3 miles, and our division, which was on the other side of the river, was ordered over and up in rear of the trains. After much delay, seemingly unnecessary, about 1 or 2 o'clock our division was ordered to act as rear-guard for the trains and move on the road to Waynesboroa. Pegram's and Wharton's divisions moved up the other side of South river to get in ahead of the trains as advance-guard, and Kershaw's and Gordon's moved on a road still farther to the right. We moved on up, hoping to surprise the Yankee cavalry, who were here destroying the depot buildings, railroad and bridge, but didn't reach the neighborhood until dark, and only succeeded in driving them off. Much delay, and my train didn't get into camp until 11 P. M. Had no dinner, and it was too late to cook
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.2 (search)
eight, had fine shoulders, chest and limbs, a handsome, manly figure, carried his head high, had clustering brown hair, a steel grey eye and a splendid sweeping mustache. Every now and then I heard, from some man or officer of his battery, or of Pegram's Battalion, some special commendation of his gallantry in action; but, he being in the Third Corps and I in the First, we seldom met. I am confident Tom Brander, John and Jim Tyler, Ferriter, and other battle-scarred veterans of Pegram's BattaliPegram's Battalion, stand ready to vouch for Beers as the equal of any soldier in the command, and some of them tenderly recall him as a good and true soldier and follower of Jesus Christ as well as of Robert Lee. I am told he was in the habit of holding religious services with the men of his battery on every fitting occasion—services which they highly appreciated. Just after the battle of Chancellorsville I was in Richmond, for what purpose I cannot now recall, unless it was that I had recently received an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
as discovered opening and cutting a way 'round Pegram's position in the direction of the entrenched ncamped, awaiting Garnett's forces to join us. Pegram, cut off by this mismanagement, was compelledht on the mountain summit. Dr. Price says General Pegram was entrenched on the summit of Rich mounte old gentleman named Anderson. But all told, Pegram's force on July 11th didn't number more than 1t, I presume, before Scott got there, attacked Pegram's force on the mountain .summit. Now, let's sever known what reason he gave for not helping Pegram that day. Dr. Price says Colonel Scott was helleading Rosecrans with three full regiments to Pegram's rear. But he soon became aware of it, and root, and dragoon—ordered Scott back to protect Pegram's rear, and believing that the forks-of-the-roin a few minutes, begin the bloody attack upon Pegram's rear. Colonel Scott had taken his positiorals got there, or at least before they struck Pegram's rear on the mountain summit. When he did ge[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Tarheels' thin Gray line. (search)
onel, Thomas F. Toon, afterwards brigadier-general), 23d North Carolina (colonel, Charles C. Blacknall), and the famous 1st North Carolina battalion sharpshooters (major, R. E. Wilson). Johnston's brigade, with Godwin's North Carolina brigade and Pegram's old Virginia brigade, under Colonel John T. Hoffian, formed Pegram's division. The Old North State is justly proud of General Bob Johnston. General Bradley T. Johnson is a Marylander, and entered the Confederate army as captain of Company APegram's division. The Old North State is justly proud of General Bob Johnston. General Bradley T. Johnson is a Marylander, and entered the Confederate army as captain of Company A, 1st Maryland infantry, Colonel Arnold Elzey commanding. He succeeded George H. Steuart, another gallant Marylander, as colonel of the regiment in June, 1863. At Second Manassas, where he commanded the Second brigade of Jackson's division, his troops ran out of ammunition and fought with stones. In the early part of 1864 he was assigned to the command of the Maryland line, stationed at Hanover Junction to protect Lee's line of communication with Richmond. He rendered valuable service in rep
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
it was apparent that they would have to espouse the cause of the South or give up their commissions, they became very averse to discussing the subject. Maury had to be extremely careful in his expressions. He had the feeling of being watched. One evening in May, 1861, an anxious group was gathered in the office of Adjutant Maury. There was Loring, the grizzled regimental commander, who had fought through two wars and was destined to win honor and glory in another. There was also Lieutenant John Pegram, of Virginia, who was to gain distinction as a general officer of the Confederacy and fall fighting for his home and his people. Maury was there, troubled and anxious, fearing the news which was expected with the mail-bag would force him to give up forever the cherished friends of a lifetime. He felt his sword could never be turned against Virginia and the South. The mailbag came in. The adjutant had to first assort the mail for the entire garrison. Then they all eagerly seized
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
kirmish at, 9. Munford, B. B., Address of, vindicating the South, 60. Niagara, U. S. gunboat, 228. Newton, Virginius, 220. Newton, Wm B., 304. Ordnance report of Grimes' division, April 10, 1865, 177. Orr's S. C. Rifles, Sketch of, 157. Page, Captain, Thomas Jefferson, Sketch of life and deeds of, 219. Parker, Captain W. H., 137. Parksley, Monument at, unveiled, 60. Peace Congress of 1861, 70. Peace Conference in 1865, 374. Pegram Colonel W. R. J. 91. Pegram, General, John, killed, 45. Pendleton, General W. N., 52. Perry, General E. A., 194. Peters, Colonel, Winfield, of Baltimore, 26. Peters Colonel W. E.. 273. Petersburg. Battles before, in 1865, 28. Phillips, Wendell, 368. Pickett, General G E., 143, 208. Poindexter, Charles, 334. Point Pleasant, Battle of, 171. Pollard Mrs. Rose, 335. Poore, Ben Perley, 368. Porter, Commodore D., 144. Powell, Colonel, Wm. H. Preston, Wm., 295. Price, Dr. Henry M., 38. Purcell Battery