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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,126 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 528 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 402 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 296 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 246 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 230 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 214 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 180 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 170 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) or search for North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 12 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.7 (search)
doption a new constitution. The old Confederacy was abandoned, and by the express terms of the Constitution it was not to be effective until nine States should have ratified the same. The adoption of the Constitution was not the act of the people of the whole country, but of each State, as only by the separate acceptance of its terms by each State could it become binding upon her. The States were absolutely free to enter the new Union, or to retain their complete independence. Thus North Carolina and Rhode Island—the latter not being even represented at the Philadelphia convention—refused to enter. The Congress of the United States laid tariff duties upon imports from both of these Commonwealths, as in the case of other foreign States—acts which were not repealed until they entered the Union. Consolidated Government. When Mr. Henry, who was not a member of the Philadelphia convention, charged that the expression, We, the people of the United States, in terms implied a cons<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
November, 1898, Captain Kaigler first claimed this honor for his command, and in the Veteran for February, 1899, he is answered and contradicted by Captain James I. Metts, of Wilmington, who quotes statements (sustaining him), made by several North Carolina officers, among them being General W. R. Cox, whose brigade they say fired the last volley at Appomattox. In his last communication Captain Kaigler says that General Cox is liable to be mistaken, because his statement is only from recollection after thirty years have elapsed. In this Captain Kaigler is himself mistaken, for this statement of General Cox is exactly the same written by him and published, in 1879, in Moore's History of North Carolina. It was my privilege to be an active participant in that memorable morning's scenes at Appomattox as one of the staff of Majorral Bryan Grimes, and it fell to my lot to carry the last order on the field of battle immediately preceding the surrender. All the incidents of that histori
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The surrender at Appomattox. (search)
s approached their position of the morning, I rode up to General Gordon and asked where I should form line of battle. He replied, Anywhere you choose. Struck by the strangeness of the reply, I asked an explanation, whereupon he informed me that we would be surrendered. I then expressed very forcibly my dissent to being surrendered, and indignantly upbraided him for not giving me notice of such intention, as I could have escaped with my division and joined General Joe Johnston, then in North Carolina. Furthermore, that I should then inform my men of the purpose to surrender, and that whoever desired to escape that calamity could go with me, and galloped off to carry this idea into effect. Before reaching my troops, however, General Gordon overtook me, and, placing his hand upon my shoulder, asked me if I were going to desert the army and tarnish my own honor as a soldier, and said that it would be a reflection upon General Lee and an indelible disgrace to me if I, an officer of ran
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate dead of Florida. (search)
he same procession, and no one murmured. Splendid tributes of praise to Confederate heroes fell from eloquent lips to shouts welcomed by approval, which rose from the throats of the North and the South alike. Illinois and Virginia, Iowa and North Carolina, Wisconsin and New Jersey, through their soldiers, joined with Florida in honor to those who fought and bled and died for the Lost Cause, the cause which in the words of one speaker, went down in defeat, but not in dishonor. Enthusiasm lorida—Miss Elizabeth Legere Fleming. Alabama—Miss Kitty L. Roby. Georgia—Miss Minnie Sollee. Louisiana—Miss Marie M. Prioleau. Texas—Miss Annie Champlain. Virginia—Miss Anna Virginia Taliaferro. Arkansas—Miss Julia Cook. North Carolina—Miss Mamie Rogers. Tennessee—Miss Aline Buckman. Missouri—Miss Ruby DuPont. Kentucky—Miss Isabelle Livingston. Maryland—Miss Mary T. Fleming. Indian Territory—Miss Lena Dancy. Each young lady was attired
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Oration and tender of the monument. (search)
ens of Jacksonville. Response by Major-General Fitzhugh Lee. Major-General Fitzhugh Lee happily responded to an urgent request for words of greeting. It is regretted that his address, which was entirely extempore, cannot be given. He spoke in eloquent and forceful language of the cause for which each side had fought, involving differences which had to be settled by the sword, and by the sword were settled. Looking out, said he, to-day upon yonder tented city, we see Illinois and North Carolina, Wisconsin and Virginia under one flag, for a common cause, the only rivalry being as to which shall carry the flag further for freedom. He paid a beautiful tribute to those whom the monument commemorates, among whom were old comrades dear to him; that his first service after leaving West Point was in the company of Captain Kirby Smith, whose medallion appears on the monument. Patriotic Hymn. La Marsellaise. Ye sons of fame, awake to glory, Hark! Hark! What myriads bid you
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
on is somewhat out of the ordinary events, and to make it understood by all, I will have to go into particulars at the risk of being tedious. After the fall of Roanoke Island in the winter of 1862, the Federals had control of the sounds of North Carolina, and of some of the rivers emptying into them. They had occupied all the towns situated on the water, and among them New Bern, which lies at the confluence of the Neuse and Trent rivers, occupying an angle between the two—a place easily defe; the Northampton, with very low guards, and stripped of her sides or bulwarks, except a wooden rail with rope netting from that to her deck. The quiet possession of New Bern by the Federals had distressed and worried the patriotic people of North Carolina, and General Hoke, than whom there was not a more competent or brilliant officer of his rank in the Confederate army, strongly advocated a quick movement upon the place by the army, assisted by the navy on the water, predicting certain succes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ly in the night and marched up the Chickahominy somewhere north of Richmond, and near Meadow bridge. We remained at this place the balance of the night and until two or three o'clock next evening. All the while concealed from the view of the enemy posted on the opposite side of the river. About 3 o'clock P. M., June 26th, skirmish firing commenced near the railroad bridges. Soon the artillery opened on each side. We were now ordered forward to support the advance line, composed of North Carolina troops. The enemy were soon dislodged from the bridge, and retreated to Mechanicsville. Our command crossed the stream and followed the advanced line which was engaged with the enemy at Mechanicsville. Our position at this time as support was trying to men not yet iniated into the horror of war. The shells from the enemy's guns came thick and fast, and kept us awake and uneasy. We expected every minute to be ordered to the front. S. C. Reid, of Company G, was mortally wounded
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Tarheels' thin Gray line. (search)
Winchester, General Robert D. Johnston, of North Carolina, had a brigade of 800 to 1,000 muskets on ns. The instant the Yankee bugle sounded, North Carolina would halt, face to the rear rank, wait une cavalry would break and scamper back and North Carolina would about face and continue her march ind went through the Yankees by the flank of North Carolina and carried their adversaries back to the in a hurry, but the thin gray line of old North Carolina was safe. They had gotten back to the res to Bob Johnston, very piert, as we say in North Carolina, and said I: Pretty close call that, Mr. JThis is the story of the Thin Gray Line of North Carolina and the cavalry charge—a feat of arms befo-General Robert D. Johnston is a native of North Carolina, but is now a resident of Birmingham, Ala. second lieutenant, Beattie's Ford Rifles, North Carolina State troops, May 9, 1861, and in a year's and placed in the hands of each and every North Carolina schoolboy. R. D. Stewart. November 300th.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Ordnance report of Grimes's division. (search)
licate original retained by the ordnance officer of the division. To understand aright the foregoing report, it should be stated that Grimes's division (formerly Rodes's), consisted of four brigades, Battle's Alabama, Cook's Georgia, Cox's North Carolina, and Grimes's North Carolina, the last commanded by Colonel D. G. Coward. Battle's brigade comprised the 3d, 5th, 6th, 12th and 61st Alabama regiments; Cook's brigade, the 4th, 12th, 21st and 44th Georgia; Cox's brigade, the 1st , 2d, 3d, North Carolina, the last commanded by Colonel D. G. Coward. Battle's brigade comprised the 3d, 5th, 6th, 12th and 61st Alabama regiments; Cook's brigade, the 4th, 12th, 21st and 44th Georgia; Cox's brigade, the 1st , 2d, 3d, 4th, 14th and 30th North Carolina; Grimes's brigade, the 32d, 43d, 45th and 53d North Carolina regiments and the 2d North Carolina battalion, as large as some of the regiments. There were thus twenty regiments with 722 muskets in their hands, an average of thirty-six to the regiment, not four to the company. There were, however, about thirty-two rounds of ammunition per musket in the cartridge-boxes, forty in the brigade ordinance wagons, and fifteen in the division train, or eighty-seven, say
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
l Huger at Suffolk, Va. Colonel Armistead continued in command of the 57th Virginia regiment until April, 1862, when he was promoted to brigadier-general. On the 20th of February, 1862, Brigadier-General A. G. Blanchard, commanding at Portsmouth, Va., moved Colonel Armistead's 57th Virginia regiment, and one section of Girardy's battery to defend the Blackwater river and cause its blockade. This force garrisoned Fort Dillard at the confluence of the Blackwater and Nottoway rivers, in North Carolina, until May 12th, when it was evacuated. Captain Magruder was directed to embark his company on an old steamboat and proceed up the river to Franklin. It had in tow a large schooner, which Captain Magruder was ordered to sink in the channel about seven miles below Franklin, to prevent pursuit by the enemy's gunboats, which might attempt to come up the river from Edenton. This work, after considerable trouble with the leaking steamboat, was successfully accomplished, and Captain Magrude
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