hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 461 449 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 457 125 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 432 88 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 425 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 398 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 346 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 303 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 247 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 210 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 201 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Fredericksburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 45 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover county heroes. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, October 15, 1899.] (search)
ty-Fourth Virginia cavalry. Chapman Tyler, Enon Church. William Timberlake, Enon Church. Arthur Timberlake, Enon Church. Mosby's cavalry. Wirt M. Binford, Harmony Church. Artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis Minor Coleman, Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Page's battery. Sergeant C. S. Stone, Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Corporal Thomas L. Jones, Second Manassas, 1862. Samuel Baker, Richmond, 1862. N. A. Cross, Richmond, 1862. W. T. Ford, Richmond, 186Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. Corporal Thomas L. Jones, Second Manassas, 1862. Samuel Baker, Richmond, 1862. N. A. Cross, Richmond, 1862. W. T. Ford, Richmond, 1862. Martin Baker, Richmond, 1862. William J. Chapman, Fort Delaware, 1864. M. C. Lowry, Fort Delaware, 1864. William E. Luck, Fort Delaware, 1864. W. T. Yarborough, Fort Delaware, 1865. Oscar Chisholm, Hanover Courthouse, 1864. J. G. Lane, Hanover Courthouse, 1864. J. W. Eddleton, Point Lookout, 1864. Ferdinand Elmer, Gettysburg, 1863. B. H. Stone, Gettysburg, 1863. Joseph Stone, Gettysburg, 1863. T. F. Woody, Gettysburg, 1863. J. O. McGhee, Somerville Ford, 186
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Hon. T. S. Garnett (search)
admirable writings and justified the assertion of one who knew him well: hat he was the most accomplished, wisest, most disinterested, best and gentlest of all the men who were his contemporaries. He was the Treasurer of Virginia and collector of customs of the port of Tappahannock. He died at Font Hill on the 18th day of July, 1887, poor, as men count riches in this world, but rich, immeasurably rich, in honor. An incident recently published in the columns of the Free Lance, Fredericksburg, Va., touchingly illustrates the equanimity of Mr. Hunter in adversity. A correspondent of that paper wrote: Your editorial of a recent date, in which you sketch the political life of R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, recalls to my mind the last time I saw him. It was in 1883, at his little country mill in Essex. As I entered the mill he measured for a customer a peck of meal, and said: I think that is good measure. He who had had the applause of listening senates to command took
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ok breakfast at Petersburg, Va., and reached Richmond about 12 o'clock noon. We left Richmond in the afternoon on the Fredericksburg road, reaching Guiney's Station after night. Tents were pitched in short order and a good night's rest obtained. Thille sounded we formed line in about three inches of snow. After remaining stationed a few days we were moved nearer Fredericksburg, to a point near Massaponax church, picketing the roads towards Fredericksburg. We remained in this camp until theFredericksburg. We remained in this camp until the last week in May, when General Johnson evacuated Yorktown and Peninsula and withdrew his forces to around Richmond. The commands near Fredericksburg were ordered to Richmond. When we reached Ashland we met some of our cavalry who had that day engaFredericksburg were ordered to Richmond. When we reached Ashland we met some of our cavalry who had that day engaged the enemy on our extreme left wing. Branch's brigade and the cavalry had driven the enemy back before we reached the field. The next day we reached the Chickahominy above Richmond and camped in a low marshy piece of Woodland. The night of th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
battle of Sharpsburg. Upon the return of Lee's army to Virginia the Florida regiments, the 2d, 5th and 8th were formed into a brigade and placed under the command of General Edward A. Perry. The brigade did gallant service at the battles of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862; Chancellorsville, May 3-4, 1863; at Gettysburg, as detailed; at Bristow's Station, October 14, 1863, and in other engagements—Captain Fleming constantly participating. He sealed his devotion to the cause he loved so well,d we received orders to hold our position, without pressing the enemy, until Longstreet could come into position on our right. He came into position and engaged the enemy about 3 P. M., our line being similar to the one formed in the rear of Fredericksburg after the Chancellorsville fight—that is, Longstreet on the right, and Ewell on the left, almost confronting each other, and forming nearly a right angle, with Hill in the centre; we received orders to conform our lines to Longstreet's moveme
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
father by flag of truce to Richmond, in October, 1863. He was buried at Glenmore, in Albemarle county. His cousin, James Watson Magruder, himself afterward killed on the battlefield at Meadow Bridge, May 11th, 1864, writing from camp near Fredericksburg. August 8, 1863, said: From last information, John now sleeps among those gallant spirits who that day bore our banner so nobly against the ramparts of the enemy on the battlefield in a foreign land. If so, he died with his laurels thick aris army, and that general—it may be, to repair the bridges at Harper's Ferry and other places, and it was not until late in the fall that the Army of the Potomac attempted to cross at Harper's Ferry, and advanced upon Culpeper and along the Rappahannock river. The probabilities are, therefore, that our little stand at the ford below Sheppardstown, where twenty guns and 175 infantry held McClellan's victorious army for a whole day, and again on the next day, when General Hill drove his reconnois
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ven him by Lee, and followed Longstreet to Fredericksburg. Making demonstrations at Chester and Tho of Orange Courthouse, and then by road to Fredericksburg. Both Lee and Jackson would have much pon bridge across the Rappahannock opposite Fredericksburg, in order to permit Franklin's corps to cre crossing of the Rappahannock in front of Fredericksburg. These brave and daring fighters well perloose his heavy guns, and soon the city of Fredericksburg was in flames and one body of infantry croranklin, crossed the pontoon bridges below Fredericksburg, and were spread a few miles along the linds Richmond, while Sumner led 31,000 into Fredericksburg by the upper pontoon bridges. As the fos Corps, to find Jackson in position at Hamilton's Crossing, and that A. P. Hill's 10,000 veterans o advance from the cover of the streets of Fredericksburg in the vain attempt to capture Marye's Hiluarters along the line of the railway from Fredericksburg to Aquia creek, with a base of supplies at[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The monument to Mosby's men. (search)
em off as prisoners of war; they had fought beneath the very guns that protected the Federal Capitol; that they had crossed the Potomac into Maryland, and celebrated the 4th of July by the victory at Point of Rocks; that when Sheridan was driving Early up the Valley of Virginia, they had constantly raided his line of communications and captured his outposts. We find from the records of the war that it required as many men to protect, from Mosby's attacks, the lines of communication from Fredericksburg to Washington, from Washington to Harper's Ferry, from Harper's Ferry to Winchester and Strasburg, as General Sheridan had employed in fighting Early's army in his front. Unsuccessful plan. We learn from these same records that the Federal government had mapped out a plan of campaign that contemplated driving the Confederates up the Valley of Virginia, then repairing the railroad from Strasburg through Front Royal to Washington, so that the victorious troops of Sheridan could be qu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.47 (search)
rginia soldier, he was a splendid type of each. His descent. General Maury was born in Fredericksburg, May 21, 1822. He was descended from the old-time Virginia families of Maury, Fontaine, Brocould have been. William Lewis Maury died at the age of twenty. General Maury grew up at Fredericksburg, where he received his preparatory education, and when quite young entered the University ofn the A. B. course, and also took the junior course in law. He prosecuted his law studies at Fredericksburg under the celebrated Judge Lomax, but he finally determined that the law was not to his likiarm shattered by a ball at the battle of Cerro Gordo, and he was sent home. The citizens of Fredericksburg presented him with a splendid sword as a token of their appreciation of the gallantry of th lieutenant-colonel in the provisional army. He was given leave to go to see his people, at Fredericksburg. The Sunday he spent there he could hear all day the cannonading at Manassas. He took the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In the Confederate service. (search)
nnessee, and, as many thought, the downfall of the Confederacy. General Maury's request for a different post was answered with an assignment to the Army of Fredericksburg, under General Holmes, at Brooke's Station. After the victory of Manassas, both armies lay quiescent for many months. General Maury had had no opportunity faury went to work with a will. Being a graduate of the University and of West Point, he decided to establish a classical and mathematical academy for boys at Fredericksburg, where he lived. Though he always spoke in humorous depreciation of the school, it succeeded. But teaching was not at all to General Maury's tastes, and whee coffin be hauled to the railroad station on a caisson, followed by a few of my old comrades. I want my body to be sent to the old family burying-ground, at Fredericksburg, that I may sleep with my people. There was general sorrow in Richmond last night at the news of General Maury's death. At no other place was the expressi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The funeral. (search)
All that is mortal of General Dabney H. Maury was laid to rest Saturday in Fredericksburg, beside the graves of his mother and wife, and in the city where he was borsion filed out. The remains were carried to the Union depot and left for Fredericksburg over the Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac railroad on the noon train. The details from the two veteran camps here accompanied the remains to Fredericksburg. Remains in Fredericksburg. The remains of General Maury arrived at FredericFredericksburg. The remains of General Maury arrived at Fredericksburg Saturday afternoon, February 13th, on the 1:37 train from Richmond. They were accompanied by Messrs. D. C. Richardson, George L. Christian, Captain John CussoFredericksburg Saturday afternoon, February 13th, on the 1:37 train from Richmond. They were accompanied by Messrs. D. C. Richardson, George L. Christian, Captain John Cussons, W. P. Smith, Captain C. C. Scott, Rev. James P. Smith, F. B. Elliott, A. O. Jones, Thomas P. Pollard, W. U. Bass, T. R. Gates, A. Jennings, R. N. Northen, Charlesving Major-General of the Confederate States Army, and who was born at Fredericksburg, Virginia, May 21, 1822. Drawing his life-springs from lines which have shed
1 2