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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 717 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 676 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 478 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 417 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 411 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 409 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 344 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 332 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 325 5 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 320 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) or search for Vicksburg (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
ubmitted by its chairman, J. D. B. De Bow, editor of De Bow's Review, a South Carolinian then domiciled in New Orleans. The report was favorable to the re-opening of the trade. Just about that time some five hundred Africans had been landed from a slaver on the coast of Georgia, and prominent Georgians were being pursued in the Federal courts as participants in the crime of importing them. De Bow's report was debated and postponed for action until the meeting of 1859, appointed for Vicksburg, Miss. Referring to Mr. Yancey's speech, or rather speeches, for he spoke the greater part of two days, Dr. McGuire says: Mr. Yancey, in an able and powerful speech, urged that the African slave trade be revived. Dr. McGuire has fallen into an error, not peculiar to himself, but one which greatly annoyed Mr. Yancey in his lifetime, and which he studiously sought to correct at every opportunity. I will relate one example of his corrections. In the Alabama secession convention, Mr. Yancey