Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Elizabeth White or search for Elizabeth White in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How Lieut. Walter Bowie of Mosby's command met his end. [from the Richmond, Va., Times, June 23, 1900. (search)
of Federal cavalay, and taken to the Old Capitol, at Washington, a prisoner, where he remained until the close of the war. The rest of our party, now reduced to eight, our original number, made our way to Virginia, taking the peak of the Sugar-Loaf Mountain as our guide and inspiration, for this overlooked our place of safety—Virginia. The dreary and lonely ride was made in silence and without incident, reaching the mountains about noon, where we rested until dark, when a lady who had two sons in White's Battalion, invited us to supper, and informed us that the pickets on the river had been ordered to Virginia on a raid. This seemed proverbial. After partaking of the hospitality of our benefactress, we crossed the Rubicon in safety—the end of a most eventful raid. John Randolph made a report to Colonel Mosby of our sad casualty, who was much distressed at the loss of such a promising young officer. Jas. G. Wiltshire, 2d Lieut. Mosby's Battalion. Baltimore, Md., May, 19
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
ry his rations in his journey across the Valley of Virginia, such had been the wanton destruction of the growing crops, barns, &c. But soon it leaked out that we were bound for Harper's Ferry, at which point some 11,000 men under command of General White were stationed. So after fording the Potomac again and reaching Virginia we pushed on, gaining the heights overlooking this historic town made famous by the John Brown raid of Oct. 19, 1859, and witnessed the surrender of White's command, White's command, with 11,000 prisoners, seventy-three pieces of artillery, and all of his arms and equipments, the captured troops marching up in regular Cornwallis style. The whole battalion was engaged on the Heights. But there! Stop! Soon we see a courier coming. Something is up! What's the matter? The assembly call is blown. Marching orders are received and soon we are on our way to Sharpsburg, where we were to meet that gentlemanly soldier, General George B. McClellan, who was again in command of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
es, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial and Literary Association of Missouri; Mrs. Leroy Valliant, President; Mrs. Jennie Edwards, Secretary. The Warren Memorial Association, Front Royal, Va.; Mrs. G. C. Davis, President; Mrs. W. C. Weaver, Corresponding Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, Memphis, Tenn.; Mrs. Letitia A. Frazer, President; Phoebe Frazer, Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, Fort Mills, S. C.; Mrs. J. B. Mack, President; Mrs. Elizabeth White, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial Association, Knoxville, Tenn.; Mrs. Wm. Caswell, President; Mrs. M. E. Lloyd, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial Association, Gainesville, Ala.; Mrs. D. H. Williams, President; M. B. Jackson, Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, New Orleans, La.; Mrs. W. G. Behan, President; Mrs. Joseph Jones, Corresponding Secretary. The Southern Memorial Association, Fayetteville, Ark.; Mrs. Lizzie Pollard, President; Miss Julia A. Garsid