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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 355 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 147 23 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 137 13 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 7 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 129 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 125 13 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 108 38 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 85 7 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 84 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 70 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Banks or search for Banks in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
he siege of Richmond raised, and an hundred thousand of the best troops of the Union paralyzed and neutralized, while the army of Northern Virginia first staggered Banks at Cedar Mountain and then drove Pope's legions in pell mell disorder back into the entrenchments around Washington. 'Twas so, as has been said, that he compassed back your train and establish your camp at the woods this side of Mt Jackson. All my information is to the effect that the Federal troops from the East are for Banks. Very truly yours T. J. Jackson, Maj. Gen. How many men were captured of Harper's company so far as you have ascertained? The first in order of these cullowing. Returning swiftly to the Valley of Virginia, Jackson prepared to pursue the campaign, which resulted in the quick and successive defeats of the armies of Banks, Fremont and Shields, which made Jackson master of the entire Valley. In May, 1862, the First Maryland Infantry, under Major-General Ewell, joined Jackson in th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
I have used the term combative by calculation, meaning by that the conviction of General Lee that the Confederate armies could not afford to conduct a purely defensive warfare—if in strategy, not in tactics. His greatest successes were won by aggressive operations. So McClellan's grand army was pushed back upon its gunboats, the siege of Richmond raised, and an hundred thousand of the best troops of the Union paralyzed and neutralized, while the army of Northern Virginia first staggered Banks at Cedar Mountain and then drove Pope's legions in pell mell disorder back into the entrenchments around Washington. 'Twas so, as has been said, that he compassed that victory at Chancellorsville, which is still the study and wonder of the military schools of the world. 'Twas so that he freed the Valley of Virginia from invasion, sent Hooker back into Pennsylvania to defend his own; and 'twas so that the ark of Southern independence might have floated on the high tide of Gettysburg, but fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland Confederates. (search)
rning the bridge at Ripley's if it does not interfere with your falling back. Send back your train and establish your camp at the woods this side of Mt Jackson. All my information is to the effect that the Federal troops from the East are for Banks. Very truly yours T. J. Jackson, Maj. Gen. How many men were captured of Harper's company so far as you have ascertained? The first in order of these curious papers is an order from General J. E. Johnston to Captain Ashby, when Johnstoields at Kernstown, March 23, 1862, and his defeat of Milroy at McDowell, May 8, following. Returning swiftly to the Valley of Virginia, Jackson prepared to pursue the campaign, which resulted in the quick and successive defeats of the armies of Banks, Fremont and Shields, which made Jackson master of the entire Valley. In May, 1862, the First Maryland Infantry, under Major-General Ewell, joined Jackson in the Valley. Major W. W. Goldsborough, in his Maryland Line, C. S. A., 1869, tells of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
als, under the command of Captain Frederick Crocker, had nineteen well equipped gunboats, three steamships and three sloops of war. It is presumed the steamships and sloops were transports, as they took no part in the engagement. What the Federal design was in its attack at Sabine Pass is mere conjecture, as the departments at Washington have never revealed it, but there is reason to believe that their intention was to invade Texas, Arkansas and North Louisiana. A plan had been laid by General Banks somewhat to this effect, and judging from the number of troops, 15,000, it is supposed this was the time the scheme was to be accomplished. When we remember that only forty-two brave men foiled him, too much honor cannot be paid to their memory, and we, the United Daughters of the Confederacy of Beaumont, have named our chapter for their leader, Lieutenant Dowling. There are only two survivors of this wonderful battle, but many citizens who remember all the incidents perfectly. Mrs.