hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 30 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 9 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 23 1 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 15 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 10 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 7 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Benton or search for Benton in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association Listens to a masterly oration by Judge Charles E. Fenner. (search)
ervice adapted to the wants of the country; he augmented the seacoast and frontier defenses; he had the western part of the continent explored for scientific, geographical and railroad purposes. He was universally recognized as a great secretary of war, and few have filled that high office who left behind him more enduring monuments of wise and efficient administration. Let us now return to Mr. Davis' career as a senator. That was the era of senatorial giants. Clay, Webster, Calhoun, Benton, Seward, Benjamin, Douglas, Toombs, and a host of other men hardly less distinguished adorned its rolls and formed a galaxy of genius such as has rarely been gathered in any deliberative body. It is not too much to say that Jefferson Davis promptly took his place amongst the foremost of them all, and won speedy and universal recognition as inferior to none in power of debate, in forensic eloquence, in indomitable courage and tact, in breadth and depth of knowledge, and in masterly equipment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
) only met two men whom I prized as being above all the world I have ever known, and the greater of these two was General Lee, America s greatest man, as I understand history. The present Chief Magistrate of this country wrote twelve years ago, that the world has never seen better soldiers than those who followed Lee, and that their leader will undoubtedly rank as, without any exception, the very greatest of all great captains that English-speaking people have brought forth. (See Life of Benton, page 38 ) Is it a matter of surprise, then, that the same hand should have recently written: I am extremely proud of the fact that one of my uncles was an admiral in the Confederate navy, and that another fired the last gun fired aboard the Alabama. I think (he says) the time has now come when we can, all of us, be proud of the valor shown on both sides in the civil war. If President Roosevelt really believed that his uncles were ever rebels and traitors, would he be extremely pro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
) only met two men whom I prized as being above all the world I have ever known, and the greater of these two was General Lee, America s greatest man, as I understand history. The present Chief Magistrate of this country wrote twelve years ago, that the world has never seen better soldiers than those who followed Lee, and that their leader will undoubtedly rank as, without any exception, the very greatest of all great captains that English-speaking people have brought forth. (See Life of Benton, page 38 ) Is it a matter of surprise, then, that the same hand should have recently written: I am extremely proud of the fact that one of my uncles was an admiral in the Confederate navy, and that another fired the last gun fired aboard the Alabama. I think (he says) the time has now come when we can, all of us, be proud of the valor shown on both sides in the civil war. If President Roosevelt really believed that his uncles were ever rebels and traitors, would he be extremely pro