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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 895 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 706 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 615 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 536 38 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 465 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 417 7 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 414 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 393 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 376 16 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 369 33 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitzhugh Lee or search for Fitzhugh Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 8 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
. Lee, James Longstreet, William E. Taylor, Fitzhugh Lee, George W. Alexander, Robert H. Booker, Johder, and saying that, if not complied with, General Lee would not be responsible for the action of nt James Pleasants, who was complimented by Fitzhugh Lee in General Orders, No. 1, to the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee's division, April 4, 1864. Resolutions to the honor and memory of James Plerinted. In October, 1863, I was ordered by General Lee to assemble the Maryland Line, then in sepa or two of each other, and which were vital for Lee's communication with the Valley, with Richmond,information to our wagon trains, in rear of General Lee's army. Communicate with me by way of ththence by train to Hanover Junction, and joined Lee's immortals. Hard fighting commenced at onceted his forces at and around this position, and Lee had gathered his invincibles to oppose hint. in the Sixtieth Virgina Regiment, and was with Lee when he surrendered at Appomattox. He had gone[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
l amnesty proclamation, which by common consent was held to cover Mr. Davis' case, and upon the 15th of February, 1869, the following order was entered in the Circuit Court of Richmond: Monday, February 15, 1869. United States Vs. Upon Indictment for Treason. Thomas P. Turner, William Smith, Wade Hampton, Benjamin Huger, Henry A. Wise, Samuel Cooper, G. W. C. Lee, W. H. F. Lee, Charles Mallory, William Mahone, O. F. Baxter, Robert E. Lee, James Longstreet, William E. Taylor, Fitzhugh Lee, George W. Alexander, Robert H. Booker, John DeBree, M. D. Corse, Eppa Hunton, Roger A. Pryor, D. B. Bridgeford, Jubal A. Early, R. S. Ewell, William S. Winder, George Booker, Cornelius Boyle, William H. Payne, R. S. Andrews, C. J. Faulkner, and R. H. Dulaney, W. N. McVeigh, H. B. Taylor, James A. Seddon, W. B. Richards, Jr., J. C. Breckinridge, and Jefferson Davis. (two cases.) The District Attorney, by leave of the court, saith that he will not prosecute further on behalf of the U
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. (search)
pen ground for several hundred yards all around the fort covered with abattis and large fallen pine trees to impede assailants. If we could ever have taken it we never could have held it. The expedition was under the immediate command of General Fitzhugh Lee, and originated with him, it was said at the time, to drive some negro soldiers off Virginia soil. We left Hanover Junction about 6 P. M. on the 23d, and rode all night and much of the time at a gallop. Early on the morning of the 24th we were near the fort, but for some inexplicable reason the attack was delayed. A flag of truce was sent in to General Wild, commanding the post, demanding immediate surrender, and saying that, if not complied with, General Lee would not be responsible for the action of his men when the fort was taken. Wild answered: We will try that. It was 11 o'clock before we began to get into position. In the mean time, the gunboats Dawn, Pequot, and the Atlanta (ironclad) were shelling us fiercely and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
ean improperly. Napoleon I said that Tom Paine, by virtue of his patriotic deeds in behalf of the American patriots during the revolution, was entitled to a monument of brass. So say we of the gallant James Pleasants, who was complimented by Fitzhugh Lee in General Orders, No. 1, to the Army of Northern Virginia, Lee's division, April 4, 1864. Resolutions to the honor and memory of James Pleasants may also be found among the records of the Southern Historical Society, at Richmond, Va. ThLee's division, April 4, 1864. Resolutions to the honor and memory of James Pleasants may also be found among the records of the Southern Historical Society, at Richmond, Va. The original Roll. Officers. Julian Harrison, captain; dead. G. F. Harrison, first lieutenant. A. M. Hobson, second lieutenant; dead. John D. Hobson, third lieutenant. W. R. Fleming, first sergeant; dead. John A. Picket, second sergeant; dead. C. B. Trevillian, third sergeant. W. W. Wright, fourth sergeant; dead. James M. Trice, first corporal. J. G. Ragland, second corporal. J. C. James, third corporal. T. M. Fleming, fourth corporal. Privates. Garland
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.25 (search)
1864: Among your collection of unpublished military dispatches you may include these two, which have never been printed. In October, 1863, I was ordered by General Lee to assemble the Maryland Line, then in separate commands in the Army of Northern Virginia—except the Latrobe Battery, which was with the Army of the Southwest —guard the five long, high bridges there, over the North Anna, the South Anna, and the Middle river, all within a mile or two of each other, and which were vital for Lee's communication with the Valley, with Richmond, and thence the whole South. I there collected the Second Maryland Infantry, First Maryland Cavalry, First Marylanhey get away. Be sure to barricade the roads with felled trees, in case they start in that direction, and also send information to our wagon trains, in rear of General Lee's army. Communicate with me by way of the Telegraph road. I left a small picket at Ashland, which, however, may run in at any moment. I have not yet lea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ved at Cold Harbor from Monroe Draft (now Ronceverte, West Va.) They had been on the road one month and three days and had fought Sigel at New Market, May 15th. From there they went to Staunton, and thence by train to Hanover Junction, and joined Lee's immortals. Hard fighting commenced at once and continued all along the line to the Patawet river. We fell back from this point to Cold Harbor (June 2d) and relieved General Lomax's division of cavalry. General Grant had consolidated his forces at and around this position, and Lee had gathered his invincibles to oppose hint. On the afternoon of the 2d the enemy obtained an advantage by capturing our picket line, but this was of short duration. With the alacrity only known to the southern soldier, we recaptured the line, and were fully established in our first position, where we remained, soldier-like, oblivious to the coming storm. On the morning of June 3d, just at dawn, the artillery pealed forth its death melody, and in an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
rd, and were marching upon Fredericksburg. General Lee at once put his whole army in motion, with and sent to Southeastern Virginia, leaving General Lee with scarcely fifty thousand infantry with to find that the sun had already risen and General Lee had gone. General Jackson, who was just monce of his columns, standing talking to General Fitzhugh Lee in the old turnpike road, at a point ab the whole Federal army between himself and General Lee, and the two divisions of Longstreet's corpankee lieutenant, whom they had just captured. Lee turned to the officer and asked him smilingly wofficer, Hooker has both Jackson and your great Lee in the hollow of his hand, and it is only a matlosed in a grim smile, but he said nothing, and Lee and his troopers rode away, laughing, leaving uwith Jackson's victorious corps in his rear and Lee in his front, strange as it may seem, Hooker's The whole North would have been laid open, and Lee's victorious army, augmented by thousands of en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
eral David, Infamous order of, 128; Hon. R. M. T., 346. Jackson, General T. J, Orders of, 133; prowess of, 135; at Chancellorsville, 167; killing of, 169, 331. Johnson, Mrs., Anna Hayes, 33; General B. T., Services of, 35, 227, 246; Mrs. Jane Claudia, Memoir of, and monument to, 33; Hon. Wm., 33. Johnston, General J E., Orders of, 133, 280. Jones, D. D., Rev. J. Wm., 127. Kennon's Landing, Attack on, 141. Lane's Brigade, General J. H., 333. Ledbetter, M. T., 354. Lee, General, Fitzhugh. 142. Lee, General R. E., Life and Character of, 82; and Washington, a parallel, 88; Strategy of, 90; at Chambersburg, 119; at Gettysburg, 124; Surrender by. 177; peerless, 192; sublime in action, 191; did not offer his sword to Grant, 269, 309. Letcher, Governor, John, 364. Lewis, Dr Samuel E., 273. Lincoln, Assassination of, 46, 56; offered no terms, 177 call for troops in 1861, 253. Little General Henry, Burial of, 212. Lively. E. H., 177, 227. Lost Chapter, in C. S