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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 346 18 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 114 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 90 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 67 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 62 2 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 49 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 45 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 40 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitz John Porter or search for Fitz John Porter in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
de-adjutant. Booth was a typical young officer and had been adjutant of the First Maryland. At Second Manassas this brigade, reduced to about 800 effectives, for nearly two days fought desperately and heroically at the railroad cut against Fitz John Porter's Corps, holding its ground to the end, repulsing many attacks in heavy force and often making counter charges. It was truthfully said that the air was thick with leaden hail. When physical endurance and cartridges alike were nearly exhausudity, while the weather has been intensely cold. If I wasn't one of them my heart would bleed for the gaunt, shivering wretches all around me; but misery loves company. As yet there has been but one desertion from our battalion, a fellow named Porter, and there will not be another. March 27—Fighting has been going on for the past two days along our front south of Petersburg, and it is evident the crisis is approaching. In the series of engagements the enemy has been successful, attacking
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
f Jones' brigade in the Stonewall division (General Jones being disabled.) Colonel Johnson put Captain Goldsborough in command of the 48th Virginia Regiment (the ranking officer present for duty being a captain) and made Captain G. W. Booth his brigade-adjutant. Booth was a typical young officer and had been adjutant of the First Maryland. At Second Manassas this brigade, reduced to about 800 effectives, for nearly two days fought desperately and heroically at the railroad cut against Fitz John Porter's Corps, holding its ground to the end, repulsing many attacks in heavy force and often making counter charges. It was truthfully said that the air was thick with leaden hail. When physical endurance and cartridges alike were nearly exhausted, Captain Booth providentially discovered General Pender's brigade moving to the firing, when that gallant officer promptly reinforced Colonel Johnson's decimated but invincible line (in much the same way that the First Maryland and Third Tenness
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
our own losses were heavy, they were not heavier than the enemy's. As stated before, night put an end to the battle and to our pursuit, and the remnant of Fitz John Porter's corps, under cover of darkness, escaped across the bridges of the Chickahominy and joined McClellan's forces south of that stream, whence they retreated to who commanded the Confederate army, and General Jackson, who commanded on our part of the field; and, besides, we have the evidence of the Federal commander, General Porter. Here is what General Lee says: About 4:30, when General Hood was preparing to lead the Fourth Texas to storm the enemy's works, he met General Lee, who annoederals continued in retreat to fight with stubborn resistance. And he further remarked, that the men who carried this position were soldiers indeed. General Fitz John Porter, the Federal commander, says: As if for a final effort, as the shades of evening were coming upon us and the woods were filled with smoke limiting the vi