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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,404 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 200 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 188 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 184 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 166 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 164 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 132 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 100 0 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 100 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) or search for Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis Monument Association holds the First celebration of the day of memory. (search)
. E. Howard McCaleb. Mr. McCaleb said that he would not attempt, on this ninety-third anniversary of the birth of Mr. Davis, to give even a brief outline of a life and character which are so intimately interwoven with the history of the country, but rather to recall a few personal reminiscences which he cherished of this great and noble leader. Mr. McCaleb said that the first time he saw Mr. Davis was when the speaker was a mere child. Mr. Davis was returning from the sanguinary fields of Mexico crowned with honors. The people of his adopted State had turned out en masse to welcome him. The boys threw up their hats as he passed, riding erect as an arrow, his face wreathed with smiles as he received the plaudits of his fellowmen. It was at Manassas that Mr. McCaleb next saw the great president. It was the day after the battle of Bull Run. And again he saw him in the last dying hours of the Confederacy, when he learned more and more to esteem, honor and love him. The Confederate
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
, and thereby preventing the threatened establishment of an Empire by France in Mexico. He frankly declared that in his opinion the final result of the proposed milis of the Monroe Doctrine were directly involved in the contest then going on in Mexico; that the Administration at Washington, according to all accounts, was decidedly opposed to the establishment of an Empire in Mexico by France, and wished to maintain the right of self-government to all peoples on this continent against the domi hostilities between themselves until this principle is maintained in behalf of Mexico; and might it not when successfully sustained there, naturally, and would it nomperor of France was at that time attempting to violate this great principle in Mexico; that the suspension of hostilities and allowance of time for the blood of our onfederate States would agree to join in sending any portion of their army into Mexico. In that view his colleagues on the commission fully concurred. Mr. Lincoln,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
d intermediate is the monument to the lamented Captain Wm. H. Murray and his men, and surrounding all these are five hundred men and officers of the invincible armies of the glorious Confederacy. Ah! realm of tombs! but let her bear, This blazon to the last of times: No nation rose so white and fair, Or fell so pure of crimes. From early manhood the career of Major Goldsborough was replete with the stress and storm of arms. As a lad he ran away from home to enlist for the war against Mexico, but was overtaken in Baltimore and taken back home. During the war between the States his life was full of adventures, perils, battles, wounds and prison hardships. By nature he was, he admitted, a man who loved fighting, and was always in the thick of battle. Among the many brave, daring and skillful line officers of the Maryland line in the Confederate army, Major Goldsborough stood in the forefront, surpassed by none, if indeed he was wholly equalled. Descended from a distinguished
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
y preventing the threatened establishment of an Empire by France in Mexico. He frankly declared that in his opinion the final result of the proe Doctrine were directly involved in the contest then going on in Mexico; that the Administration at Washington, according to all accounts, was decidedly opposed to the establishment of an Empire in Mexico by France, and wished to maintain the right of self-government to all people between themselves until this principle is maintained in behalf of Mexico; and might it not when successfully sustained there, naturally, andance was at that time attempting to violate this great principle in Mexico; that the suspension of hostilities and allowance of time for the btates would agree to join in sending any portion of their army into Mexico. In that view his colleagues on the commission fully concurred. Marms. As a lad he ran away from home to enlist for the war against Mexico, but was overtaken in Baltimore and taken back home. During the wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.40 (search)
eneral topography of the country and streams. The stream of Sabine Pass flows from Sabine Lake into the Gulf of Mexico. It is about seven miles long, slightly less than one mile wide, and ranges in depth from twenty to forty feet. At the time a bar had formed at the gulf end, and the Channel over it was only about ten feet deep, and very tortuous and difficult to navigate. The stream forms a dividing line between Texas and Louisiana, and was once the boundary between the United States and Mexico. Its banks are very low, at the highest places on the Texas side not extending over three feet above low tide, while the Louisiana side is much lower, is an extensive marsh, and is inundated whenever the tide comes in above normal. All the surrounding country is a low marsh, except where the town is located on a ridge about three feet above low tide. The town is situated on the west or Texas side, about five miles from the gulf end of the stream. On the Texas bank the Confederates had