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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 236 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 106 0 Browse Search
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves. 88 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 46 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 38 0 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 30 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 26 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Sallust, The Jugurthine War (ed. John Selby Watson, Rev. John Selby Watson, M.A.) 24 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Africa or search for Africa in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
had to begin life over again. His oldest son, John, who had gone South, died in Camp Chase as a prisoner of war. His wife, who is still living, held on to her home pluckily, and kept her younger children about her in spite of the rough soldiery, who exercised upon them all the petty tyranny characteristic of that period in the treatment of rebels and traitors. The story of the privations of this family, told in detail, falls little short of the reports of some later Boer experiences in South Africa. The sword of Lee. [from the Baltimore sun, August, 1901.] It was not offered to General Grant at Appomattox. Colonel Marshall's testimony. He corrects an Oft—Repeated misstatement that is without the slightest Foundation—What General Grant wrote about the matter. The following correspondence between Mr. Spotswood Bird, of Baltimore, a member of Company F, Twenty-fourth Regiment Virginia Cavalry, Confederate States Army, and Colonel Charles Marshall, of this city, corre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
s were many of the leading men of Baltimore in all walks of life. Some of these gentlemen had sons and other kinsmen in the South to whom they wished to send shoes, boots and other supplies, together with letters from home, and it is quite possible that Mr. Emmerich helped them to do so, for he was acquainted with the underground agencies so operating. If so, he paid dearly for his service. He was kept in the penitentiary until some time after the war was over, and when he was released had to begin life over again. His oldest son, John, who had gone South, died in Camp Chase as a prisoner of war. His wife, who is still living, held on to her home pluckily, and kept her younger children about her in spite of the rough soldiery, who exercised upon them all the petty tyranny characteristic of that period in the treatment of rebels and traitors. The story of the privations of this family, told in detail, falls little short of the reports of some later Boer experiences in South Africa.