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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 103 27 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 57 9 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 46 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 40 4 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 40 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 33 13 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 27 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) or search for Charlotte (North Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jefferson Davis Monument Association holds the First celebration of the day of memory. (search)
owmen. It was at Manassas that Mr. McCaleb next saw the great president. It was the day after the battle of Bull Run. And again he saw him in the last dying hours of the Confederacy, when he learned more and more to esteem, honor and love him. The Confederate government had abandoned Richmond, and was temporarily stationed at Danville, Va., when General Extra Billy Smith brought the sad news of Lee's surrender. All was confusion, and in hot haste. Mr. Mc-Caleb said, we hurried to Charlotte, N. C. There Mr. Davis sent for me, and told me that the Confederate cabinet was about to begin its journey southward, and in command of a brave band of Mississippians belonging to Harris' and Humphreys' Mississippi brigades. I accompanied him as far south as Washington, Ga. In that distinguished cavalcade was President Davis himself, General John C. Breckenridge, Secretary of War; Hon. Stephen R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy; Hon. Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of State; Hon. John H. R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
s involved, not only his life, but his property also, and his entire family were launched into the Confederate struggle voluntarily, and suffered accordingly. [Charlotte Observer, January 3, 1902.] Brook Church fight, and something about the Fifth North Carolina cavalry. Death of James B. Gordon. He was the Murat of thss and love for all his men, which he was continually doing, that caused the men of the Fifth all to love him. North Carolina troops. [Raleigh correspondence Charlotte observer, Oct., 1901.] How they were armed during the War between the States. In a previous article, the extracts from Governor Ellis's letter books werereensville (S. C.) Southern Enterprise, on May 5, 1865, announcing the cessation of armed hostilities east of the Chattahoochee, is in possession of a citizen of Charlotte. The extra covers only one side of a small sheet about 6x14 inches. The head is only one column wide. The story is as follows: The Southern Enterprise.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Maryland Confederates. (search)
aged in the battle. For the preceding sketch the Southern Historical Society Papers is indebted to Lieutenant-Colonel Winfield Peters, of the Maryland State Line, of Baltimore, the Maryland member of the History Committee of the United Confederate Veterans, late commander of J. R. Trimble Camp Confederate Veterans, etc., who was a private in the first Maryland infantry, C. S. A. This regiment, forming at Harper's Ferry, Va., was recruited largely from the First Rifle regiment of Baltimore, through the efforts of its commander, Colonel George Peters, father of Lieutenant-Colonel Peters, and his son. The Senior Colonel Peters also entered the Confederate service, served faithfully to the end, and died from the consequences of privation and exposure soon after the surrender. His sacrifices involved, not only his life, but his property also, and his entire family were launched into the Confederate struggle voluntarily, and suffered accordingly. [Charlotte Observer, January 3, 1902.]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
North Carolina troops. [Raleigh correspondence Charlotte observer, Oct., 1901.] How they were armed during the War between the States. In a previous article, the extracts from Governor Ellis's letter books were given. Governor Ellis kept an ordnance book, in which his correspondence, directions, etc., in regard to arms and munitions of war are to be found. Many persons have asked how this State armed its troops in 1861. It has been shown that 30,000 rifles and three full batteries of cannon, besides thirty other cannon, were seized at the Fayetteville arsenal, and that 11,000 of the rifles were given to the State of Virginia, the others being used by the North Carolina troops. The ordnance book shows how the other supplies with which to start the war, the powder, the bullets, etc., were obtained. The first entry in the ordnance book is the list of stores, amounting to $242,000, recommended by C. C. Tew and D. H. Hill to be purchased, the recommendation being dated J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
A memory of May 5, 1865. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, August 19, 1901.] Orders published in a paper announcing cessation of hostilities. contributed by D. H. Littlejohn. A very interesting newspaper extra, published by the Greensville (S. C.) Southern Enterprise, on May 5, 1865, announcing the cessation of armed hostilities east of the Chattahoochee, is in possession of a citizen of Charlotte. The extra covers only one side of a small sheet about 6x14 inches. The head is only one column wide. The story is as follows: The Southern Enterprise. Extra. Greenville, S. C., Friday, May 5, 1865. highly important. Cessation of Armed Hostilities East of the Chattahoochee River. Johnston and Sherman's orders. We have been furnished with a copy of the following important and interesting orders, which we give to the public in this shape. We hope soon to resume the regular issues of our paper. All are aware of the cause of the present suspension. The r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
Storming the Stone fence at Gettysburg. [from the Charlotte (N. C.) observer, March 11, 1901.] A Morganton Confederate veteran tells of the charge. I, Thomas Espy Causby, born in Burke county, N. C., June 24, 1831, make this statement of my recollections of the great battle of Gettysburg. Many of the little details I have forgotten, but of the facts herein stated I am absolutely positive. I enlisted as a private in Company D, Sixth North Carolina regiment, in the early part of the year 1861, and fought in the ranks through the war until I was wounded in the battles around Petersburg, and was in a hospital at Richmond at the time of the surrender. I was in the first battle at Manassas, was at Fredericksburg, Sharpsburg, the Seven Days battles below Richmond, Gettysburg, and the fights around Petersburg. Before the battle of Gettysburg our brigade, commanded by Colonel Isaac Avery, of Burke county, was camped at Little York, Pa., where we remained two nights and a da