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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 298 44 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 252 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 126 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 90 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 69 1 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 35 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Warren or search for Warren in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
anks. But further and further westward crept that fateful left flank of the Federal army. It was badly punished in each extension, but every inch of ground that Warren gained he held. Dark days were upon us. The shadow of the inevitable was beginning to obscure the bow of hope. 'Twas as the winter fell that I first observed y statue which gratitude has erected to patriotism in America you will find Rebel written. The springing shaft at Bunker Hill, the modest shaft which tells where Warren fell, * * * the fortresses which line our coasts, the name of our country's capital, the very streets of our cities—all proclaim America's boundless debt to rebels; not only to rebels who, like Hamilton and Warren, gave their first love and service to the young Republic, but rebels who, like Franklin and Washington, broke their oath of allegiance to become rebels. And so, we say, let them call us what they may, the justice of our cause precludes fear on our part as to the final verdict
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
ongstreet held the north shore and the approaches to Richmond with a grip not to be shaken. Mahone and his division won fame in no scant measure at the Crater and on the Weldon road. Heth and Hampton broke through Hancock's ranks at Reams' Station and captured many prisoners, colors and guns. The cavalry wrought wonders on the flanks. But further and further westward crept that fateful left flank of the Federal army. It was badly punished in each extension, but every inch of ground that Warren gained he held. Dark days were upon us. The shadow of the inevitable was beginning to obscure the bow of hope. 'Twas as the winter fell that I first observed the deepened lines of care that not all the serenity of a soul at peace with God and itself could smooth from the countenance of General Lee. The raven hair of four years before was already bleached into silver, and though too thorough a gentleman to betray abstraction, his speech, except on business, was rare. In fact, at this pe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of the history Committee (search)
Clinton passionately denounced the patriotic women of New York. At the base of every statue which gratitude has erected to patriotism in America you will find Rebel written. The springing shaft at Bunker Hill, the modest shaft which tells where Warren fell, * * * the fortresses which line our coasts, the name of our country's capital, the very streets of our cities—all proclaim America's boundless debt to rebels; not only to rebels who, like Hamilton and Warren, gave their first love and serviWarren, gave their first love and service to the young Republic, but rebels who, like Franklin and Washington, broke their oath of allegiance to become rebels. And so, we say, let them call us what they may, the justice of our cause precludes fear on our part as to the final verdict of history. We can commit the principles for which we fought; we can confide the story of our deeds; we can consign the heritage of heroism we have bequeathed the world to posterity with the confident expectation of justice at the hands of the coming