Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Patrick or search for Patrick in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
he last one was crowding in upon the cars as the train stopped. Nor was that the worst, for it seemed that every wife, mother or sister in the mob expected her soldier boy to accompany her home for the day. Oh, Captain, for the love of God, let Patrick go home with me. I have a good dinner cooked for him, and he'll be in camp to-night. Oh, do, Captain; maybe I'll never see my boy again, importuned an old Irish mother. Impossible, madam, strict orders to keep the men in ranks, was the reply. Mon Dieu, Lieutenant! let my lila garcon, Jules, go my'ouse. His petitesis-tar seek. Come back queek, said another. Impossible, madam.. But Patrick slipped, and Mike followed; Jules dodged through the pressing crowd, and Pierre also. Of course, in such a crowd of admiring patriots, with hearts overflowing with patriotism, whiskey was slipped to the boys going off to fight the battles of the country, and the liquor soon began to tell, so by the time the march began many of the soldiers we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Biographical sketch of Major-General Patrick. R. Cleburne. (search)
Biographical sketch of Major-General Patrick. R. Cleburne. By General W. J. Hardee. The following sketch of General Cleburne was written by General Hardee in May, 1867, and published at that time. In view of the fact that General Cleburne was one of the most distinguished major-generals in the Confederate army, and also because of his tragic death, the article will be greatly appreciated now. It is as follows: The sketch is necessarily imperfect, from the want of official records. Most of these were lost or destroyed by the casualties attending the close of the war, and those still in existence are difficult of access. Of Cleburne's early life little is known. The record of his service in the Southern armies belongs to the yet unwritten history of the Lost Cause. In better days, when the passions and prejudices engendered by civil strife shall have disappeared, and history brings in a dispassionate verdict, the name of Cleburne will appear high in the list of patriots a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
d. Phillips, Private J. J. M. Spence, Private Joseph. Whitehorne, Sergeant J. Edward; wounded. Welton, Private George; wounded. Welton, Private William; killed. Company G —Richmond Grays. Burke, Private Edmund; killed. Brett, Sergeant William P. Bowers, Private N. M. Ford, Private William H.; wounded. Fisher, Private Charles. Gibson, Private Jedeth; killed. Gibson, Private, Jr. Hankins, Private James F. Kelley, Sergeant Oscar R. Kelly, Lieutenant Patrick H. Lovenstein, Private Isadore. McConnochie, Private David. Muhl, Private Oscar O. Phillips, First Lieutenant James F. Rogers, Private Augustus F. Robins, Private Albert H. Robbins, Private Augustus F. Sacrey, Private J. B.; killed. Walsh, Private Thomas C. Company H —Norfolk Juniors. Baldry, Sergeant John R.; killed. Beale, Lieutenant Charles L.; wounded. Guffin, Private A. J.; wounded. Gale, Private William B. James, Private Edward.