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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Capitol (Utah, United States) or search for Capitol (Utah, United States) in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last Capitol of the Confederacy at Danville. (search)
tage from that point. The president and other prominent government officials were upon their arrival at Danville carried to the residence of Major W. T. Sutherlin, commandant of the town. For a week thereafter the Sutherlin residence was the capitol of the Confederate States. The occupancy of the capitol by the president and his cabinet members ceased even more abruptly than it began. On Monday morning, April 10, information reaached Danville of the surrender of Lee on the previous day.capitol by the president and his cabinet members ceased even more abruptly than it began. On Monday morning, April 10, information reaached Danville of the surrender of Lee on the previous day. Circumstances made the immediate evacuation of the place necessary. It is a historic landmark, that old mansion, and its appearance is in keeping with its history. A large, square stone structure, with wings on both sides, it is set far back in grounds having a frontage the width of an entire block. It looks at the same time neat, trim and substantial. It has an almost human expression of cold, aristocratic dignity, however, that cannot fail to impress even the most casual beholder.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
ex. B. Clitheroe, register, and E. C. Elmore, treasurer. The body of the bill is black and green, and the figure fifty is many times repeated in circles and in bands. At the bottom of the bill are the words: National Bank Note Company, both to right and left. The back is plain white and on it is this endorsement: Issued July 5, 1861; Thomas K. Jackson, Captain, C. S. A., written in red ink. On the $100 bill is a train of cars; on the $500 a rural scene, and on the $1,000 a picture of the capitol at Montgomery. The first regular issue of bills was made at Richmond, and began with two bills engraved by the Southern Bank Note Company, of New Orleans. These are almost, if not quite, equal, both in design and execution, to those issued by the National Bank Note Company. The dates in these are not printed, but are written in, and on both the specimens shown the date is August 28, 1861. The $50 bill has in the centre two females, personifying liberty and justice, while the $100 bill