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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,078 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 442 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 430 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 330 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 324 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 306 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 284 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 254 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 150 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Maryland (Maryland, United States) or search for Maryland (Maryland, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
ent lawyer in West Virginia; White's Battalion, by Major Robert White, late Attorney-General of West Virginia; the Maryland Battalion, by Major Sturgis Davis, of Maryland, who had won his laurels under Turner Ashby; Gilmor's Battalion of Rangers, by Harry Gilmor, of Baltimore, who was as rough and daring a rider as ever drew a sabticipated. The regiment was organized in response to Lincoln's proclamation of June 15, 1863, calling for additional troops to repel the Confederate invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania, and the expectation was that it would be employed only in home defense and not sent outside of Maryland. Richardson's kinspeople, in BaltimoMaryland. Richardson's kinspeople, in Baltimore, were divided on the questions involved in the war. His father had gone from the Whig party into the Know Nothing, the Native American, and, finally, the Black Republican party—as it was then styled. But a brother of his father, a staunch, influential Democrat, had edited a daily newspaper in Baltimore, and—counting the courag
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
eir shoes. Every step our army made northward it became weaker. At last we stood on the long-dreamed — of banks of the Potomac. It was near Shepherdstown, and Maryland, my Maryland, met our gaze at last, which shone— Fair as the gardens of the Lord To the famished eyes of the rebel horde. With a rush and a swing we paMaryland, met our gaze at last, which shone— Fair as the gardens of the Lord To the famished eyes of the rebel horde. With a rush and a swing we passed through the royal city of Frederick, where we got scant welcome, up the dusty broad pike northward to Hagerstown, where the people received the ragged Rebs as if they were belted knights, with victory on their plumes. Here every soldier got as much as he could eat. Then there came the long roll and we fell into ranks and sor 860 men in ranks, now stood in their tracks with 41 muskets and 7 officers. My! my! What a set of ragamuffins they looked! It seemed as if every cornfield in Maryland had been robbed of its scarecrows and propped up against that fence. None had any underclothing. My costume consisted of a ragged pair of trousers, a stained, <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
nt of Richmond, and the failure of his peninsula campaign was due, in his opinion, to the unwillingness of the designing politicians at Washington to see a Democrat gain the prestige and political influence that a decisive victory at Richmond would have given him. His army had been virtually taken away from him after the change of base to James river, and given to Pope, with the result that it was badly beaten in the second battle of Manassas. Only when General Lee crossed the Potomac into Maryland and his advance upon Washington was feared, was General McClellan again placed in command to save the situation—which he did at Antietam by causing General Lee to recross the Potomac. Soon after that action General McClellan was again deprived of his command, for the reason, it was believed in 1862, that a general was wanted who preferred the success of the Republican party to the restoration of the Union. Whether this belief was or was not correct it is unnecessary to consider, but it is
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert Edward Lee. (search)
o all the States and that there was no thought of excluding any or hampering any in making an absolutely free choice of representatives, may be quoted the language of Mr. Morrill himself, who said in a speech on the occasion when the statue of Lewis Cass was placed in the Hall in 1889: We have much reason to expect the grand old hall will ere long be adorned by such notable figures, possibly, as would be that of Benton, from Missouri, or those of Charles Carroll and William Wirt, from Maryland; Lincoln and Douglas, from Illinois; Grimes, from Iowa; Morton and Hendricks, of Indiana; Webster, from New Hampshire; Macon, once styled the last of the Romans, from North Carolina; Clay, from Kentucky; Calhoun, from South Carolina; William H. Crawford and George M. Troup, from Georgia; Austin and Sam Houston, from Texas, and Madison and Patrick Henry, from Virginia, with a long illustrious list of others easily to be mentioned, sufficient to show that our materials to make the hall nation
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
Maryland and the South. [from the Baltimore sun, January 19, 1904.1 Some of the State's claat Cedar Mountain? Charles Sydney Winder, of Maryland! Who, while helmets cleft and sabres clashin but our gallant Light horse Harry Gilmor, of Maryland, and peerless Ridgely Brown, slain in battle. Who was the brave soldier who commanded the Maryland Line, and, ever foremost in the fight, capturlucher of the day? This was Arnold Elzey, of Maryland. And who shall tell of Trimble, commander on the field of Gettysburg— marks the spot! Maryland had nine generals in the Confederate army. y, are natives of the Southern States than of Maryland—unselfish, generous Maryland! Her people areMaryland! Her people are an honor to our race! And when I pay tribute to Maryland as a State, and to her people as unexamess sons. And we, the wives and mothers of Maryland men, for us the proudest heritage to be handerious host of heroes, 20,000 of the flower of Maryland's youth and chivalry, who left home and luxur[14 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hunter Holmes McGuire, M. D., Ll. D. (search)
d years later, fought in vain to preserve. His father, Dr. Hugh Holmes McGuire, was a physician and surgeon of the older type, and it is not invidious to say that his fame exceeded that of any other member of his profession in all the regions west of the Blue Ridge mountains. Many came to him from afar to be healed. As a surgeon, his operations down to the close of his life fully sustained his well-earned reputation. His specialty, if any he had, was the eye, and multitudes came from Maryland, from Pennsylvania, and from beyond the Alleghanies to receive treatment at his hands. He was the frankest and the most unassuming of men; bluntness well-nigh to the verge of brusqueness marked his deliverances of speech, but no man had nicer perceptions of the proprieties of life, and none more free than he from intentionally wounding the sensibilities of others. His correctness and rapidity of diagnosis were marvellous. His originality in the selection of remedies, and in his methods o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The burning of Chambersburg, Penn. [from the New Orleans, La., Picayune, August 2, 1903.] (search)
cient to explain the reason why the city of Chambersburg, in Pennsylvania, was burned. Location of forces. It may be considered indispensable to give the location of the force composing the Federal and Confederate armies during the latter part of the month of July, 1864, in order to properly understand the raid that was made into the State of Pennsylvania which resulted in the destruction of Chambersburg. Hunter's army was scattered along the northern bank of the Potomac river, in Maryland, from near Hancock to Harper's Ferry, the main body being near the latter place. Early was located on the opposite side of the same river. My command was on the left of Early's army, and I think that Averill's cavaly was located opposite to me—at least a portion of it was there. When I speak of cavalry in the course of this sketch, I am aware that the term is not properly applied, for so far as the Confederate troops which I commanded were concerned, they were badly armed, badly mounte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Crenshaw Battery, (search)
he war. The Crenshaw Battery was awarded two of the captured guns. Hooker defeated, another idol shattered by Lee, we were destined to meet a new commander of the army of the Potomac when we came up again with our old-time enemy. General Meade had succeeded Hooker. With a rest from fighting from the 3d of May until the 1st of July, we headed for the Potomac for the second time. Once over that stream, what a refreshing sight from the devastated fields of Virginia to the green fields of Maryland and Pennsylvania, for we were en route to Gettysburg. We were greeted all along the route with remarks of all kinds from the ladies, some of them not very complimentary. But the boys kept their temper and laughed them off. Pegram's Battalion (of which the Crenshaw Battery was a part) marched behind the whole army into Pennsylvania, but when we got near the enemy it was hurried to the front, and we fired the first gun in the battle of Gettysburg, Braxton keeping down the Emmittsbur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.53 (search)
tle was fought exclusively by Mississippians (see Ante, p. 60.) I was surgeon at Fort Gregg all the preceding winter and early spring. I was with my command in Fort Gregg from start to finish, and know by whom it was defended. Captain Chew, of Maryland, with about twenty artillerymen, with two guns, was part of the force. Chew's other two guns had been taken out of the fort to check the advance of the enemy in our front, but to no purpose; the lean horses could not pull the pieces through theeveral determined charges with great slaughter to the enemy. The New York Herald acknowledged a loss of two thousand and four hundred killed and crippled. When the Federals were forming for their final charge, I suggested to Captain Chew, of Maryland, to surrender, as there was no chance of ultimate success by holding out any longer. My advice was not accepted, as the captain said he had been superseded by some infantry officers, who had come to his help. There were so many Federals coming
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
McClanahan, Captain John H., 12. McCausland, General, John, 266. McClellan General G. B., For Peace,, 45. McClure, Colonel A. K., 86. McDaniel, C. S. N., Master, 330. McGrath, General, John, 103. McGuire, Dr., Hunter, statue to, 249,362. Merritt, General, Wesley, 66. McKelway, St. Clair, 97. Mallett, Prof. John W., 100. Manassas, Second Battle of, 278. Mangam, Lt. John H., 217. Manning, Colonel, Wade Hampton, 73. McNeill, Rangers of Captain John H., 12; Jesse. 12. Maryland's claims in the war, 209. Maury M. F., 326; Col. R. L., 326. Maxwell, John, 330. Miles, Colonel D. S., killed, 32. Miller, Captain, Wm. A., 2. Minor's Battery, 16; Captain Robert D., 327. Missionary Ridge, Battle of, 155. Mitchell, Geo. E., 124. Montague, Gov. A. J., 253. Morgan, General John H., killing of, 125. Murfreesboro, Battle of, 154. Napier on war, Lord, 318. Naval Brigade, 137. Negroes in the C. S. Army, 215, 365. New Market Battle of, commemorate